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Analysis of sentinel node biopsy - a single-institution experience supporting the use of serial sectioning and immunohistochemistry for detection of micrometastases by comparing four different histopathological laboratory protocols.

Grabau, Dorthe LU ; Rydén, Lisa LU ; Fernö, Mårten LU and Ingvar, Christian LU (2011) In Histopathology 59. p.129-138
Abstract
Histopathology Analysis of sentinel node biopsy - a single-institution experience supporting the use of serial sectioning and immunohistochemistry for detection of micrometastases by comparing four different histopathological laboratory protocols Aims:  Detecting micrometastases (>0.2 and ≤2 mm/>200 cells) and isolated tumour cells (ITCs; ≤0.2 mm/<200 cells) is important for staging of breast cancer patients. The aim of this study was to systematically compare several laboratory protocols used to detect metastases after initial intraoperative frozen section examination. Methods and results:  Four different protocols for the work-up of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) after frozen sectioning were applied in the routine diagnostic... (More)
Histopathology Analysis of sentinel node biopsy - a single-institution experience supporting the use of serial sectioning and immunohistochemistry for detection of micrometastases by comparing four different histopathological laboratory protocols Aims:  Detecting micrometastases (>0.2 and ≤2 mm/>200 cells) and isolated tumour cells (ITCs; ≤0.2 mm/<200 cells) is important for staging of breast cancer patients. The aim of this study was to systematically compare several laboratory protocols used to detect metastases after initial intraoperative frozen section examination. Methods and results:  Four different protocols for the work-up of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) after frozen sectioning were applied in the routine diagnostic process from 2001 to 2009. In addition, team-work with a limited number of laboratory technicians and pathologists handling SLNs was introduced in 2008. The present study shows that there were, overall, significantly more node-positive patients in the period when team-work and intensive step sections including immunohistochemistry (IHC) were used (P = 0.01). This resulted in 13% more patients being found to have ITCs and micrometastases than in a time period when only step sections were performed. No increase in the number of false-negative frozen sections was seen. Conclusions:  Future guidelines for pathological work-up of sentinel nodes in women with breast cancer might include team-work and IHC if frozen sections are used intraoperatively. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Histopathology
volume
59
pages
129 - 138
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000293006600015
  • pmid:21668472
  • scopus:79960465217
ISSN
0309-0167
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2559.2011.03881.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
94ce8003-b6af-4183-8eb6-bf64515d89e7 (old id 2008145)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21668472?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-07-04 14:23:17
date last changed
2017-05-28 04:34:54
@article{94ce8003-b6af-4183-8eb6-bf64515d89e7,
  abstract     = {Histopathology Analysis of sentinel node biopsy - a single-institution experience supporting the use of serial sectioning and immunohistochemistry for detection of micrometastases by comparing four different histopathological laboratory protocols Aims:  Detecting micrometastases (&gt;0.2 and ≤2 mm/&gt;200 cells) and isolated tumour cells (ITCs; ≤0.2 mm/&lt;200 cells) is important for staging of breast cancer patients. The aim of this study was to systematically compare several laboratory protocols used to detect metastases after initial intraoperative frozen section examination. Methods and results:  Four different protocols for the work-up of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) after frozen sectioning were applied in the routine diagnostic process from 2001 to 2009. In addition, team-work with a limited number of laboratory technicians and pathologists handling SLNs was introduced in 2008. The present study shows that there were, overall, significantly more node-positive patients in the period when team-work and intensive step sections including immunohistochemistry (IHC) were used (P = 0.01). This resulted in 13% more patients being found to have ITCs and micrometastases than in a time period when only step sections were performed. No increase in the number of false-negative frozen sections was seen. Conclusions:  Future guidelines for pathological work-up of sentinel nodes in women with breast cancer might include team-work and IHC if frozen sections are used intraoperatively.},
  author       = {Grabau, Dorthe and Rydén, Lisa and Fernö, Mårten and Ingvar, Christian},
  issn         = {0309-0167},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {129--138},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Histopathology},
  title        = {Analysis of sentinel node biopsy - a single-institution experience supporting the use of serial sectioning and immunohistochemistry for detection of micrometastases by comparing four different histopathological laboratory protocols.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2559.2011.03881.x},
  volume       = {59},
  year         = {2011},
}