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Case in Icelandic : A Synchronic, Diachronic and Comparative Approach

Barddal, Johanna LU (2001) In Lundastudier i nordisk språkvetenskap. Serie A 57.
Abstract
This dissertation addresses the question of what the function of morphological case is in Icelandic. The working hypotheses of this book is that morphological case is a multifunctional category. Firstly, new verbs in Icelandic were collected and examined to cast light on the productivity of the morphological cases, revealing that not only are the nominative and accusative productive in Icelandic but also the dative. Secondly, a text-based investigation was conducted to find out what the statistical correlation is between morphological case, syntactic functions and thematic roles. Thus, a well-stratified corpus was compiled, containing Modern Icelandic texts from five written genres and one spoken genre. The study showed that there is a... (More)
This dissertation addresses the question of what the function of morphological case is in Icelandic. The working hypotheses of this book is that morphological case is a multifunctional category. Firstly, new verbs in Icelandic were collected and examined to cast light on the productivity of the morphological cases, revealing that not only are the nominative and accusative productive in Icelandic but also the dative. Secondly, a text-based investigation was conducted to find out what the statistical correlation is between morphological case, syntactic functions and thematic roles. Thus, a well-stratified corpus was compiled, containing Modern Icelandic texts from five written genres and one spoken genre. The study showed that there is a correlation between morphological case and both syntactic and semantic factors. Thirdly, a similar corpus was compiled for Old Icelandic, containing four genres which are closest in content to the Modern Icelandic genres. Some frequency differences were found between the two corpora, reflecting a change in the use of morphological case from Old to Modern Icelandic. Fourthly, a comparison of the development of case in English, Swedish and German revealed that the internal order of the changes within the case system is the same for the Germanic languages considered, with English leading the development, followed closely by Swedish, then German, and Icelandic lagging behind. The theoretical approach adopted in this work is that of Construction Grammar and the Usage-based model. (Less)
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author
opponent
  • Dahl, Östen
organization
publishing date
type
Thesis
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Scandinavian languages and literature, Development of th, Scandinavian Linguistics, Spoken vs. Written Icelandic, Usage-based Model, Construction Grammar, Borrowings, Neologism, Type Frequency, Productivity, Argument Structure, Thematic Roles, Syntactic functions, Icelandic, Morphological Case, Nordiska språk (språk och litteratur), Grammar, semantics, semiotics, syntax, Grammatik, semantik, semiotik, Linguistics, Lingvistik
in
Lundastudier i nordisk språkvetenskap. Serie A
volume
57
pages
279 pages
publisher
Scandinavian Languages
defense location
Sal Kock, Humanisthuset
defense date
2001-09-22 10:15
ISSN
0347-8971
ISBN
91-628-4898-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a3681e0a-be84-470f-bef2-5b27b9c7d9ac (old id 20250)
date added to LUP
2007-05-28 09:52:10
date last changed
2016-09-19 08:44:57
@phdthesis{a3681e0a-be84-470f-bef2-5b27b9c7d9ac,
  abstract     = {This dissertation addresses the question of what the function of morphological case is in Icelandic. The working hypotheses of this book is that morphological case is a multifunctional category. Firstly, new verbs in Icelandic were collected and examined to cast light on the productivity of the morphological cases, revealing that not only are the nominative and accusative productive in Icelandic but also the dative. Secondly, a text-based investigation was conducted to find out what the statistical correlation is between morphological case, syntactic functions and thematic roles. Thus, a well-stratified corpus was compiled, containing Modern Icelandic texts from five written genres and one spoken genre. The study showed that there is a correlation between morphological case and both syntactic and semantic factors. Thirdly, a similar corpus was compiled for Old Icelandic, containing four genres which are closest in content to the Modern Icelandic genres. Some frequency differences were found between the two corpora, reflecting a change in the use of morphological case from Old to Modern Icelandic. Fourthly, a comparison of the development of case in English, Swedish and German revealed that the internal order of the changes within the case system is the same for the Germanic languages considered, with English leading the development, followed closely by Swedish, then German, and Icelandic lagging behind. The theoretical approach adopted in this work is that of Construction Grammar and the Usage-based model.},
  author       = {Barddal, Johanna},
  isbn         = {91-628-4898-4},
  issn         = {0347-8971},
  keyword      = {Scandinavian languages and literature,Development of th,Scandinavian Linguistics,Spoken vs. Written Icelandic,Usage-based Model,Construction Grammar,Borrowings,Neologism,Type Frequency,Productivity,Argument Structure,Thematic Roles,Syntactic functions,Icelandic,Morphological Case,Nordiska språk (språk och litteratur),Grammar,semantics,semiotics,syntax,Grammatik,semantik,semiotik,Linguistics,Lingvistik},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {279},
  publisher    = {Scandinavian Languages},
  school       = {Lund University},
  series       = {Lundastudier i nordisk språkvetenskap. Serie A},
  title        = {Case in Icelandic : A Synchronic, Diachronic and Comparative Approach},
  volume       = {57},
  year         = {2001},
}