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Energy management in Swedish pulp and paper industry - the daily grind that matters

Stenqvist, Christian LU ; Nilsson, Lars J LU ; Ericsson, Karin LU and Modig, Gunnar LU (2011) 10th eceee summer study - energy efficiency first: the foundation of a low-carbon society
Abstract
The Swedish pulp and paper industry (PPI) accounts for almost 50 percent of industrial final energy use. It is an energy-intensive industry and process optimization is seen as prerequisite to compete on the global market. This alone should motivate company boards and on-site organisations to put energy management high on the agenda. Definitely, from time to time, energy issues (e.g. fuel shifts, selling of generation capacity, and more lately increasing auto-produced electricity) have been managed with respect to combined effects of policies and market forces. Yet, it was first after 2004 that the industry implemented energy management systems (EnMS), with particular focus on energy efficiency, and received certification according to the... (More)
The Swedish pulp and paper industry (PPI) accounts for almost 50 percent of industrial final energy use. It is an energy-intensive industry and process optimization is seen as prerequisite to compete on the global market. This alone should motivate company boards and on-site organisations to put energy management high on the agenda. Definitely, from time to time, energy issues (e.g. fuel shifts, selling of generation capacity, and more lately increasing auto-produced electricity) have been managed with respect to combined effects of policies and market forces. Yet, it was first after 2004 that the industry implemented energy management systems (EnMS), with particular focus on energy efficiency, and received certification according to the Swedish and later the European standard. This was required by the Programme for improving energy efficiency in energy-intensive industries (PFE), a five-year voluntary agreement in which some 100 companies reported gross annual electricity savings of 1.45 TWh, equal to 5 percent of base year consumption. This result highlights the potential role of an EnMS in raising awareness and facilitating investments. In this paper we analyse the case of the Swedish PPI; its relation to energy issues in previous periods and the formalised EnMS practices of recent years. We pose the questions: How are standardised EnMS structured and put into practice? What are the measurable effects and other discernible outcomes? The results are based on in-depth interviews with energy management coordinators at eight pulp and paper mills. The experiences with EnMS are found to be predominantly positive. EnMS has changed organisational structures and created greater focus on energy efficiency, which has resulted in quantified energy savings. Considering that EnMS implementation and certification is at a pioneering stage and that the international ISO 50001 standard is currently being developed, these are important results for the future of EnMS in industry. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
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Contribution to conference
publication status
published
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keywords
ISO 50001, efficiency, pulp and paper industry, energy management system, competitiveness, EN 16001
conference name
10th eceee summer study - energy efficiency first: the foundation of a low-carbon society
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
18575ddb-ab5c-47e6-8e3d-fc163f0d1c9a (old id 2026510)
date added to LUP
2011-07-19 12:32:24
date last changed
2016-04-16 12:04:12
@misc{18575ddb-ab5c-47e6-8e3d-fc163f0d1c9a,
  abstract     = {The Swedish pulp and paper industry (PPI) accounts for almost 50 percent of industrial final energy use. It is an energy-intensive industry and process optimization is seen as prerequisite to compete on the global market. This alone should motivate company boards and on-site organisations to put energy management high on the agenda. Definitely, from time to time, energy issues (e.g. fuel shifts, selling of generation capacity, and more lately increasing auto-produced electricity) have been managed with respect to combined effects of policies and market forces. Yet, it was first after 2004 that the industry implemented energy management systems (EnMS), with particular focus on energy efficiency, and received certification according to the Swedish and later the European standard. This was required by the Programme for improving energy efficiency in energy-intensive industries (PFE), a five-year voluntary agreement in which some 100 companies reported gross annual electricity savings of 1.45 TWh, equal to 5 percent of base year consumption. This result highlights the potential role of an EnMS in raising awareness and facilitating investments. In this paper we analyse the case of the Swedish PPI; its relation to energy issues in previous periods and the formalised EnMS practices of recent years. We pose the questions: How are standardised EnMS structured and put into practice? What are the measurable effects and other discernible outcomes? The results are based on in-depth interviews with energy management coordinators at eight pulp and paper mills. The experiences with EnMS are found to be predominantly positive. EnMS has changed organisational structures and created greater focus on energy efficiency, which has resulted in quantified energy savings. Considering that EnMS implementation and certification is at a pioneering stage and that the international ISO 50001 standard is currently being developed, these are important results for the future of EnMS in industry.},
  author       = {Stenqvist, Christian and Nilsson, Lars J and Ericsson, Karin and Modig, Gunnar},
  keyword      = {ISO 50001,efficiency,pulp and paper industry,energy management system,competitiveness,EN 16001},
  language     = {eng},
  title        = {Energy management in Swedish pulp and paper industry - the daily grind that matters},
  year         = {2011},
}