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Survival at 19 years of age in a total population of children and young people with cerebral palsy.

Westbom, Lena LU ; Bergstrand, Linda; Wagner, Philippe LU and Nordmark, Eva LU (2011) In Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology 53. p.808-814
Abstract
Aim The aims were to investigate survival of children with cerebral palsy (CP) and to search for modifiable factors that influence survival in CP. Method The total population of children with CP in southern Sweden born between 1990 and 2005, and followed from 1994 to 2010 comprised 718 children. The study included 708 of these children (297 females, 411 males) participating in a secondary prevention programme. CP subtype, Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels, and comorbidities were described. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were plotted. The following factors were investigated using Cox regression analysis: GMFCS level (co-varies with overall health), size of health care catchment area, gastrostomy feeding, and sex.... (More)
Aim The aims were to investigate survival of children with cerebral palsy (CP) and to search for modifiable factors that influence survival in CP. Method The total population of children with CP in southern Sweden born between 1990 and 2005, and followed from 1994 to 2010 comprised 718 children. The study included 708 of these children (297 females, 411 males) participating in a secondary prevention programme. CP subtype, Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels, and comorbidities were described. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were plotted. The following factors were investigated using Cox regression analysis: GMFCS level (co-varies with overall health), size of health care catchment area, gastrostomy feeding, and sex. Results The estimated survival at 19 years of age was 60% in children with the most severe gross motor limitations (GMFCS level V). Death occurred throughout childhood. All children at GMFCS level I or II, and 96% of the whole CP population, survived. The mortality risk in childhood CP was three times higher in catchment areas that covered small populations than in areas with a large population. Gastrostomy feeding was associated with a ninefold increased risk of dying, regardless of GMFCS level and catchment area. Interpretation Fragile children with CP, as indicated by GMFCS level V and gastrostomy feeding, had the lowest chance of surviving childhood. Health care catchment area seemed to influence survival rate. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology
volume
53
pages
808 - 814
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000293409200013
  • pmid:21745199
  • scopus:79960968099
ISSN
0012-1622
DOI
10.1111/j.1469-8749.2011.04027.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b2692a15-7f80-4c0a-8886-c1964e30ba14 (old id 2058751)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21745199?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-08-01 19:42:48
date last changed
2017-10-22 04:52:53
@article{b2692a15-7f80-4c0a-8886-c1964e30ba14,
  abstract     = {Aim The aims were to investigate survival of children with cerebral palsy (CP) and to search for modifiable factors that influence survival in CP. Method The total population of children with CP in southern Sweden born between 1990 and 2005, and followed from 1994 to 2010 comprised 718 children. The study included 708 of these children (297 females, 411 males) participating in a secondary prevention programme. CP subtype, Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels, and comorbidities were described. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were plotted. The following factors were investigated using Cox regression analysis: GMFCS level (co-varies with overall health), size of health care catchment area, gastrostomy feeding, and sex. Results The estimated survival at 19 years of age was 60% in children with the most severe gross motor limitations (GMFCS level V). Death occurred throughout childhood. All children at GMFCS level I or II, and 96% of the whole CP population, survived. The mortality risk in childhood CP was three times higher in catchment areas that covered small populations than in areas with a large population. Gastrostomy feeding was associated with a ninefold increased risk of dying, regardless of GMFCS level and catchment area. Interpretation Fragile children with CP, as indicated by GMFCS level V and gastrostomy feeding, had the lowest chance of surviving childhood. Health care catchment area seemed to influence survival rate.},
  author       = {Westbom, Lena and Bergstrand, Linda and Wagner, Philippe and Nordmark, Eva},
  issn         = {0012-1622},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {808--814},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology},
  title        = {Survival at 19 years of age in a total population of children and young people with cerebral palsy.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8749.2011.04027.x},
  volume       = {53},
  year         = {2011},
}