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Adaptation in the optical properties of the crystalline lens in the eyes of the Lessepsian migrant Siganus rivulatus

Gagnon, Yakir L.; Shashar, Nadav and Kröger, Ronald LU (2011) In Journal of Experimental Biology 214(16). p.2724-2729
Abstract
Vision is an important source of information for many animals. The crystalline lens plays a central role in the visual pathway and hence the ecology of fishes. In this study, we tested whether the different light regimes in the Mediterranean and Red Seas have an effect on the optical properties of the lenses in the rivulated rabbitfish, Siganus rivulatus. This species has migrated through the Suez Canal from the Red Sea and established a vital population in the Mediterranean Sea. Longitudinal spherical aberration curves and focal lengths of the fish lenses were measured by laser scans and compared between the two populations. In addition, rivulated rabbitfish from the Mediterranean Sea were exposed to colored light (yellow, green and blue)... (More)
Vision is an important source of information for many animals. The crystalline lens plays a central role in the visual pathway and hence the ecology of fishes. In this study, we tested whether the different light regimes in the Mediterranean and Red Seas have an effect on the optical properties of the lenses in the rivulated rabbitfish, Siganus rivulatus. This species has migrated through the Suez Canal from the Red Sea and established a vital population in the Mediterranean Sea. Longitudinal spherical aberration curves and focal lengths of the fish lenses were measured by laser scans and compared between the two populations. In addition, rivulated rabbitfish from the Mediterranean Sea were exposed to colored light (yellow, green and blue) and unfiltered light for periods of 1 or 13. days to test for short-term adjustments. Lens focal length was significantly longer (3%) in the Rea Sea population. The shorter focal length of the Mediterranean population can be explained as an adaptation to the dimmer light environment, as this difference makes the Mediterranean eyes 5% more sensitive than the eyes of the Red Sea population. The difference may be due to genetic differences or, more likely, adaptive developmental plasticity. Short-term regulatory mechanisms do not seem to be involved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Lessepsian migration, adaptation, fish, lens
in
Journal of Experimental Biology
volume
214
issue
16
pages
2724 - 2729
publisher
The Company of Biologists Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000293167300015
  • scopus:79961071444
ISSN
1477-9145
DOI
10.1242/jeb.048066
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1933e202-3ef1-4c5c-821a-471e09d20dde (old id 2072042)
date added to LUP
2011-08-29 09:17:43
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:13:59
@article{1933e202-3ef1-4c5c-821a-471e09d20dde,
  abstract     = {Vision is an important source of information for many animals. The crystalline lens plays a central role in the visual pathway and hence the ecology of fishes. In this study, we tested whether the different light regimes in the Mediterranean and Red Seas have an effect on the optical properties of the lenses in the rivulated rabbitfish, Siganus rivulatus. This species has migrated through the Suez Canal from the Red Sea and established a vital population in the Mediterranean Sea. Longitudinal spherical aberration curves and focal lengths of the fish lenses were measured by laser scans and compared between the two populations. In addition, rivulated rabbitfish from the Mediterranean Sea were exposed to colored light (yellow, green and blue) and unfiltered light for periods of 1 or 13. days to test for short-term adjustments. Lens focal length was significantly longer (3%) in the Rea Sea population. The shorter focal length of the Mediterranean population can be explained as an adaptation to the dimmer light environment, as this difference makes the Mediterranean eyes 5% more sensitive than the eyes of the Red Sea population. The difference may be due to genetic differences or, more likely, adaptive developmental plasticity. Short-term regulatory mechanisms do not seem to be involved.},
  author       = {Gagnon, Yakir L. and Shashar, Nadav and Kröger, Ronald},
  issn         = {1477-9145},
  keyword      = {Lessepsian migration,adaptation,fish,lens},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {16},
  pages        = {2724--2729},
  publisher    = {The Company of Biologists Ltd},
  series       = {Journal of Experimental Biology},
  title        = {Adaptation in the optical properties of the crystalline lens in the eyes of the Lessepsian migrant Siganus rivulatus},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jeb.048066},
  volume       = {214},
  year         = {2011},
}