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Postures and Movements in the Most Common Tasks of Power Line Workers

Moriguchi, Cristiane Shinohara; Carnaz, Leticia; de Alencar, Jeronimo Farias; Miranda Junior, Luiz Carlos; Granqvist, Lothy LU ; Hansson, Gert-Åke LU and Cote Gil Coury, Helenice Jane (2011) In Industrial Health 49(4). p.482-491
Abstract
The repair and maintenance of electrical power lines involves awkward postures, which are known risk factors for developing musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of the present study was to quantify postures and movements of upper arm, head, upper back and neck in the main tasks performed by line workers. Posture of twelve right-handed line workers was recorded by inclinometry and presented as percentiles of angular and angular velocity distributions. All tasks involved considerable upper-arm elevation, ranging from 73 degrees to 115 degrees for the 90th percentile. Upper-arm elevation showed significant differences between tasks, but no consistent differences between right and left sides. Regarding velocity, the right arm presented higher... (More)
The repair and maintenance of electrical power lines involves awkward postures, which are known risk factors for developing musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of the present study was to quantify postures and movements of upper arm, head, upper back and neck in the main tasks performed by line workers. Posture of twelve right-handed line workers was recorded by inclinometry and presented as percentiles of angular and angular velocity distributions. All tasks involved considerable upper-arm elevation, ranging from 73 degrees to 115 degrees for the 90th percentile. Upper-arm elevation showed significant differences between tasks, but no consistent differences between right and left sides. Regarding velocity, the right arm presented higher levels than the left arm. All tasks required significant extension of head, upper back and neck, ranging from 7 degrees to 67 degrees for head (10th percentile). All tasks, except the one performed with a continuous extension, also involved pronounced flexion, ranging from 33 degrees to 60 degrees for the head (90th percentile). Work which required highly elevated arms also required significant head extension (r(2)=0.56). Awkward postures of upper arms, head, upper back and neck were identified by inclinometry, demonstrating the need for preventative interventions to reduce musculoskeletal disorders among line workers. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Inclinometry, Shoulder, Head, Neck, Work related musculoskeletal, disorders
in
Industrial Health
volume
49
issue
4
pages
482 - 491
publisher
National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Japan
external identifiers
  • wos:000293313000011
  • scopus:80051764788
ISSN
1880-8026
DOI
10.2486/indhealth.MS1252
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d89bc9ef-357f-4490-a7b7-3a3bc23b35b4 (old id 2072123)
date added to LUP
2011-09-02 08:31:11
date last changed
2017-06-11 04:09:39
@article{d89bc9ef-357f-4490-a7b7-3a3bc23b35b4,
  abstract     = {The repair and maintenance of electrical power lines involves awkward postures, which are known risk factors for developing musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of the present study was to quantify postures and movements of upper arm, head, upper back and neck in the main tasks performed by line workers. Posture of twelve right-handed line workers was recorded by inclinometry and presented as percentiles of angular and angular velocity distributions. All tasks involved considerable upper-arm elevation, ranging from 73 degrees to 115 degrees for the 90th percentile. Upper-arm elevation showed significant differences between tasks, but no consistent differences between right and left sides. Regarding velocity, the right arm presented higher levels than the left arm. All tasks required significant extension of head, upper back and neck, ranging from 7 degrees to 67 degrees for head (10th percentile). All tasks, except the one performed with a continuous extension, also involved pronounced flexion, ranging from 33 degrees to 60 degrees for the head (90th percentile). Work which required highly elevated arms also required significant head extension (r(2)=0.56). Awkward postures of upper arms, head, upper back and neck were identified by inclinometry, demonstrating the need for preventative interventions to reduce musculoskeletal disorders among line workers.},
  author       = {Moriguchi, Cristiane Shinohara and Carnaz, Leticia and de Alencar, Jeronimo Farias and Miranda Junior, Luiz Carlos and Granqvist, Lothy and Hansson, Gert-Åke and Cote Gil Coury, Helenice Jane},
  issn         = {1880-8026},
  keyword      = {Inclinometry,Shoulder,Head,Neck,Work related musculoskeletal,disorders},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {482--491},
  publisher    = {National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Japan},
  series       = {Industrial Health},
  title        = {Postures and Movements in the Most Common Tasks of Power Line Workers},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2486/indhealth.MS1252},
  volume       = {49},
  year         = {2011},
}