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Patterns of Destiny : Hindu Nāḍī Astrology

Gansten, Martin LU (2003) In Lund Studies in History of Religions 17.
Abstract (Swedish)
Popular Abstract in Swedish

Avhandlingen behandlar en hinduisk, framför allt sydindisk form av divination vid namn <i>nadi</i>-läsning, uppbyggd efter astrologiskt mönster men med vissa utmärkande särdrag, framför allt uppläsandet av föregivet färdigskrivna texter, tillskrivna gudomliga eller övermänskliga författare, i vilka klientens levnadsöde skall ha nedtecknats långt före dennes födelse. Efter en skildring av författarens iakttagelser av denna divinationsform i dagens Indien diskuteras den klassiska hinduiska astrologins världsåskådning (i synnerhet dess förhållande till <i>karma</i>-läran) samt tekniska tillvägagångssätt i viss detalj, följt av ett närmare studium av tre astrologiska... (More)
Popular Abstract in Swedish

Avhandlingen behandlar en hinduisk, framför allt sydindisk form av divination vid namn <i>nadi</i>-läsning, uppbyggd efter astrologiskt mönster men med vissa utmärkande särdrag, framför allt uppläsandet av föregivet färdigskrivna texter, tillskrivna gudomliga eller övermänskliga författare, i vilka klientens levnadsöde skall ha nedtecknats långt före dennes födelse. Efter en skildring av författarens iakttagelser av denna divinationsform i dagens Indien diskuteras den klassiska hinduiska astrologins världsåskådning (i synnerhet dess förhållande till <i>karma</i>-läran) samt tekniska tillvägagångssätt i viss detalj, följt av ett närmare studium av tre astrologiska <i>nadi</i>-texter författade på sanskrit, ur vilka även utdrag med annoterad översättning presenteras. Texternas mest utmärkande lära visas vara tanken på ett begränsat antal möjliga ödesmönster, till något av vilka varje människa med nödvändighet föds. (Less)
Abstract
Like all divination, Hindu astrology (<i>jyotisa</i>) is concerned with central religious issues such as man’s relation to the world, moral responsibility, and the revelation of a coherent divine order underlying human experience. Comprising a descriptive as well as a prescriptive aspect, <i>jyotisa</i> allows for both prediction and the exercise of free will. This double nature enables a seamless union of astrology with the concept of <i>karman</i>, its descriptive aspect referring to ‘fate’ (<i>daiva</i>) or actions of previous lives now bearing fruit (<i>prarabdha-karman</i>), its prescriptive aspect to present action (<i>kriyamana-karman</i>) or ‘human effort’... (More)
Like all divination, Hindu astrology (<i>jyotisa</i>) is concerned with central religious issues such as man’s relation to the world, moral responsibility, and the revelation of a coherent divine order underlying human experience. Comprising a descriptive as well as a prescriptive aspect, <i>jyotisa</i> allows for both prediction and the exercise of free will. This double nature enables a seamless union of astrology with the concept of <i>karman</i>, its descriptive aspect referring to ‘fate’ (<i>daiva</i>) or actions of previous lives now bearing fruit (<i>prarabdha-karman</i>), its prescriptive aspect to present action (<i>kriyamana-karman</i>) or ‘human effort’ (<i>purusakara</i>).



Astrological divination is based on observation of planetary movements relative to the earth and to the zodiac. By the employment of a hierarchy of interpretative principles, the qualities of a given point in space-time are determined, representing a number of potential life events which by various prognostic techniques are translated into predictions. While some authors ascribe a form of causality to the planets, perceiving them as divine supervisors of <i>karman</i>, others reject causal language in favour of a view of the planets as mere signs, related synchronically to human experiences. Nevertheless, propitiation of the planetary deities for the alleviation of undesired results is a practice universally supported. Occasionally the astrologer himself serves as an object of such propitiation, becoming a full-fledged mediator between man and the divine planets by simultaneously disclosing the fate they dictate and accepting on their behalf the worship intended to remedy any anticipated misfortune.



While <i>nadi</i> reading is commonly perceived as a form of astrology, and generally moves within an astrological paradigm, most current practitioners do not base their interpretations on the client’s natal horoscope, but rather on a method of thumb reading. The (alleged) reading of predictions from preexistent texts of supposed antiquity and divine or semi-divine origin is, however, a common characteristic of all <i>nadi</i> divination. The Sanskrit <i>nadi</i> texts examined in the present study – the <i>Gurunadi</i>, <i>Amsanadi</i>, and <i>Dhruvanadi</i> – deal entirely with the interpretation of natal horoscopes. The texts, datable by the astronomical information they contain to the 18th and 19th centuries, originate in the Dravidian language area (as, most likely, does the term <i>nadi</i> itself), and may be seen as representing a common school or style of astrology, known as <i>devakerala</i>.



Divided into a number of individual horoscope readings of varying length, the texts reverse the general trend of Sanskrit astrological works to concern themselves only with universals. The readings, generally expressing a mainstream <i>smarta</i> Hindu worldview, are invariably based on minute divisions of the zodiac known as <i>nadi</i> or <i>amsa</i>, a unique feature not found elsewhere in <i>jyotisa</i> literature. The <i>amsas</i>, numbering 150 in each zodiacal sign, are thought to embody certain fixed destiny patterns, which undergo permutations by superimposition on the natal horoscope. This concept of a limited number of predefinable, basic patterns of destiny, to one of which every human being is necessarily born, marks the most drastic deviation of the <i>nadis</i> not only from mainstream Hindu astrology, but also from orthodox teachings on <i>karman</i>. (Less)
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author
opponent
  • Prof. Zydenbos, Robert, Munich
organization
publishing date
type
Thesis
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Candrakalanadi, Devakerala, Gurunadi, Dhruvanadi, Amsanadi, karman, karma, predestination, free will, fate, purusakara, daiva, divination, astrology, jyotihsastra, jyotisa, Nadi, Hindu astrology, Non-Christian religions, Världsreligioner (ej kristendom)
in
Lund Studies in History of Religions
volume
17
pages
221 pages
publisher
Almqvist & Wiksell International
defense location
Carolinasalen, Kungshuset
defense date
2003-09-30 13:30
ISSN
1103-4882
ISBN
91-22-02031-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9d12b260-b9e8-4a70-87bf-a3a411882279 (old id 20987)
date added to LUP
2007-05-28 12:13:32
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:19:05
@phdthesis{9d12b260-b9e8-4a70-87bf-a3a411882279,
  abstract     = {Like all divination, Hindu astrology (&lt;i&gt;jyotisa&lt;/i&gt;) is concerned with central religious issues such as man’s relation to the world, moral responsibility, and the revelation of a coherent divine order underlying human experience. Comprising a descriptive as well as a prescriptive aspect, &lt;i&gt;jyotisa&lt;/i&gt; allows for both prediction and the exercise of free will. This double nature enables a seamless union of astrology with the concept of &lt;i&gt;karman&lt;/i&gt;, its descriptive aspect referring to ‘fate’ (&lt;i&gt;daiva&lt;/i&gt;) or actions of previous lives now bearing fruit (&lt;i&gt;prarabdha-karman&lt;/i&gt;), its prescriptive aspect to present action (&lt;i&gt;kriyamana-karman&lt;/i&gt;) or ‘human effort’ (&lt;i&gt;purusakara&lt;/i&gt;).<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Astrological divination is based on observation of planetary movements relative to the earth and to the zodiac. By the employment of a hierarchy of interpretative principles, the qualities of a given point in space-time are determined, representing a number of potential life events which by various prognostic techniques are translated into predictions. While some authors ascribe a form of causality to the planets, perceiving them as divine supervisors of &lt;i&gt;karman&lt;/i&gt;, others reject causal language in favour of a view of the planets as mere signs, related synchronically to human experiences. Nevertheless, propitiation of the planetary deities for the alleviation of undesired results is a practice universally supported. Occasionally the astrologer himself serves as an object of such propitiation, becoming a full-fledged mediator between man and the divine planets by simultaneously disclosing the fate they dictate and accepting on their behalf the worship intended to remedy any anticipated misfortune.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
While &lt;i&gt;nadi&lt;/i&gt; reading is commonly perceived as a form of astrology, and generally moves within an astrological paradigm, most current practitioners do not base their interpretations on the client’s natal horoscope, but rather on a method of thumb reading. The (alleged) reading of predictions from preexistent texts of supposed antiquity and divine or semi-divine origin is, however, a common characteristic of all &lt;i&gt;nadi&lt;/i&gt; divination. The Sanskrit &lt;i&gt;nadi&lt;/i&gt; texts examined in the present study – the &lt;i&gt;Gurunadi&lt;/i&gt;, &lt;i&gt;Amsanadi&lt;/i&gt;, and &lt;i&gt;Dhruvanadi&lt;/i&gt; – deal entirely with the interpretation of natal horoscopes. The texts, datable by the astronomical information they contain to the 18th and 19th centuries, originate in the Dravidian language area (as, most likely, does the term &lt;i&gt;nadi&lt;/i&gt; itself), and may be seen as representing a common school or style of astrology, known as &lt;i&gt;devakerala&lt;/i&gt;.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Divided into a number of individual horoscope readings of varying length, the texts reverse the general trend of Sanskrit astrological works to concern themselves only with universals. The readings, generally expressing a mainstream &lt;i&gt;smarta&lt;/i&gt; Hindu worldview, are invariably based on minute divisions of the zodiac known as &lt;i&gt;nadi&lt;/i&gt; or &lt;i&gt;amsa&lt;/i&gt;, a unique feature not found elsewhere in &lt;i&gt;jyotisa&lt;/i&gt; literature. The &lt;i&gt;amsas&lt;/i&gt;, numbering 150 in each zodiacal sign, are thought to embody certain fixed destiny patterns, which undergo permutations by superimposition on the natal horoscope. This concept of a limited number of predefinable, basic patterns of destiny, to one of which every human being is necessarily born, marks the most drastic deviation of the &lt;i&gt;nadis&lt;/i&gt; not only from mainstream Hindu astrology, but also from orthodox teachings on &lt;i&gt;karman&lt;/i&gt;.},
  author       = {Gansten, Martin},
  isbn         = {91-22-02031-4},
  issn         = {1103-4882},
  keyword      = {Candrakalanadi,Devakerala,Gurunadi,Dhruvanadi,Amsanadi,karman,karma,predestination,free will,fate,purusakara,daiva,divination,astrology,jyotihsastra,jyotisa,Nadi,Hindu astrology,Non-Christian religions,Världsreligioner (ej kristendom)},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {221},
  publisher    = {Almqvist & Wiksell International},
  school       = {Lund University},
  series       = {Lund Studies in History of Religions},
  title        = {Patterns of Destiny : Hindu Nāḍī Astrology},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2003},
}