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Interactions driving the population cycle of Arctic small rodents

Gårding, Lars LU (2005) In Polish Journal of Ecology 53(4). p.579-584
Abstract
The cyclicity of Arctic populations of small rodents is a subject with a long history and a large literature (Batzli, 1992) in which the question "What drives the cycle?" has received many answers, among them that the source of the cycle is either rodent interaction with food or the interaction with predators or both. Another question concerns the confinement of the cycle to Arctic conditions. The paper by Garding (2000) presented a simple mathematical model of the combined predator-prey-food interaction based on a general eater-food interaction in which cycle length is an explicit decreasing function of the average birth rate of eaters. In the combined interaction, the cycle length is the same function of the sum of the average birth... (More)
The cyclicity of Arctic populations of small rodents is a subject with a long history and a large literature (Batzli, 1992) in which the question "What drives the cycle?" has received many answers, among them that the source of the cycle is either rodent interaction with food or the interaction with predators or both. Another question concerns the confinement of the cycle to Arctic conditions. The paper by Garding (2000) presented a simple mathematical model of the combined predator-prey-food interaction based on a general eater-food interaction in which cycle length is an explicit decreasing function of the average birth rate of eaters. In the combined interaction, the cycle length is the same function of the sum of the average birth rates of predators and preys Numerical fits of these models make it possible to answer the questions above. The results are that the short 3-5 year cycles of the Arctic rodents: lemming (Lemmus lemmus) and vole (Microtus agrestis) are mainly driven by interaction with food while the ten year cycle of the Canadian snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus), is driven by interaction with its predator - lynx. Rodents in the Arctic live and breed in burrows and experience predation pressure when surfacing. This explains their interaction with food. The greater variety and easier availability of food in a temperate climate accounts for a missing rodent interaction with food. The paper starts with a presentation of the eater-food interaction model itself, its simple but unfamiliar mathematics and its points of credibility. At the end of the paper sonic current hypotheses about the nature of the rodent cycle are seen in the light of the model used here. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
vole, Arctic cycle, eater-food interaction, lemming, snowshoe hare
in
Polish Journal of Ecology
volume
53
issue
4
pages
579 - 584
publisher
Polish Academy of Sciences
external identifiers
  • wos:000233941300009
  • scopus:31444435382
ISSN
1505-2249
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f5ce1438-8daa-4854-b032-589dad5738d8 (old id 210855)
alternative location
http://www.pol.j.ecol.cbe-pan.pl/article/ar53_4_09.pdf
date added to LUP
2007-08-15 10:27:52
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:06:56
@article{f5ce1438-8daa-4854-b032-589dad5738d8,
  abstract     = {The cyclicity of Arctic populations of small rodents is a subject with a long history and a large literature (Batzli, 1992) in which the question "What drives the cycle?" has received many answers, among them that the source of the cycle is either rodent interaction with food or the interaction with predators or both. Another question concerns the confinement of the cycle to Arctic conditions. The paper by Garding (2000) presented a simple mathematical model of the combined predator-prey-food interaction based on a general eater-food interaction in which cycle length is an explicit decreasing function of the average birth rate of eaters. In the combined interaction, the cycle length is the same function of the sum of the average birth rates of predators and preys Numerical fits of these models make it possible to answer the questions above. The results are that the short 3-5 year cycles of the Arctic rodents: lemming (Lemmus lemmus) and vole (Microtus agrestis) are mainly driven by interaction with food while the ten year cycle of the Canadian snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus), is driven by interaction with its predator - lynx. Rodents in the Arctic live and breed in burrows and experience predation pressure when surfacing. This explains their interaction with food. The greater variety and easier availability of food in a temperate climate accounts for a missing rodent interaction with food. The paper starts with a presentation of the eater-food interaction model itself, its simple but unfamiliar mathematics and its points of credibility. At the end of the paper sonic current hypotheses about the nature of the rodent cycle are seen in the light of the model used here.},
  author       = {Gårding, Lars},
  issn         = {1505-2249},
  keyword      = {vole,Arctic cycle,eater-food interaction,lemming,snowshoe hare},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {579--584},
  publisher    = {Polish Academy of Sciences},
  series       = {Polish Journal of Ecology},
  title        = {Interactions driving the population cycle of Arctic small rodents},
  volume       = {53},
  year         = {2005},
}