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Changes of cartilage and bone markers after intraarticular glucocorticoid treatment with and without postinjection rest in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

Weitoft, T; Larsson, A; Saxne, Tore LU and Ronnblom, L (2005) In Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 64(12). p.1750-1753
Abstract
Background: Joint immobilisation improves the therapeutic effect of intra-articular glucocorticoid injection for knee synovitis. This may be due to retarded steroid resorption by immobilisation, a procedure that also could influence cartilage and bone metabolism. Objective: To evaluate changes in cartilage and bone turnover after intra-articular glucocorticoid treatment for knee synovitis with and without postinjection rest. Methods: 20 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and knee synovitis were randomised to 24 hour bed rest or to normal activity after intra-articular glucocorticoid treatment. Serum and urine markers of cartilage and bone turnover were studied for two weeks. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) was used as a marker... (More)
Background: Joint immobilisation improves the therapeutic effect of intra-articular glucocorticoid injection for knee synovitis. This may be due to retarded steroid resorption by immobilisation, a procedure that also could influence cartilage and bone metabolism. Objective: To evaluate changes in cartilage and bone turnover after intra-articular glucocorticoid treatment for knee synovitis with and without postinjection rest. Methods: 20 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and knee synovitis were randomised to 24 hour bed rest or to normal activity after intra-articular glucocorticoid treatment. Serum and urine markers of cartilage and bone turnover were studied for two weeks. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) was used as a marker of cartilage turnover, osteocalcin as marker of bone formation, and deoxipyridinoline (DPD) as marker of bone resorption. Results: After the glucocorticoid injection COMP levels decreased in both groups (p < 0.001), but significantly more in resting patients. Serum osteocalcin levels decreased significantly (p < 0.001) without any difference between the groups. DPD was unchanged in both groups. Conclusions: Intra-articular glucocorticoid treatment for knee synovitis reduced serum COMP, which suggests that such treatment may have a cartilage protective effect. The slightly larger decrease of serum COMP in the resting group may reflect a lower clearance of COMP from the joint cavity. Serum osteocalcin was temporarily reduced, indicating a reversible suppression of bone formation. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases
volume
64
issue
12
pages
1750 - 1753
publisher
British Medical Association
external identifiers
  • wos:000233241000015
  • pmid:15843449
  • scopus:27944490312
ISSN
1468-2060
DOI
10.1136/ard.2004.035022
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
de635f40-9eeb-4a64-b4f7-3933189b587a (old id 213538)
date added to LUP
2007-08-08 10:55:36
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:38:31
@article{de635f40-9eeb-4a64-b4f7-3933189b587a,
  abstract     = {Background: Joint immobilisation improves the therapeutic effect of intra-articular glucocorticoid injection for knee synovitis. This may be due to retarded steroid resorption by immobilisation, a procedure that also could influence cartilage and bone metabolism. Objective: To evaluate changes in cartilage and bone turnover after intra-articular glucocorticoid treatment for knee synovitis with and without postinjection rest. Methods: 20 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and knee synovitis were randomised to 24 hour bed rest or to normal activity after intra-articular glucocorticoid treatment. Serum and urine markers of cartilage and bone turnover were studied for two weeks. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) was used as a marker of cartilage turnover, osteocalcin as marker of bone formation, and deoxipyridinoline (DPD) as marker of bone resorption. Results: After the glucocorticoid injection COMP levels decreased in both groups (p &lt; 0.001), but significantly more in resting patients. Serum osteocalcin levels decreased significantly (p &lt; 0.001) without any difference between the groups. DPD was unchanged in both groups. Conclusions: Intra-articular glucocorticoid treatment for knee synovitis reduced serum COMP, which suggests that such treatment may have a cartilage protective effect. The slightly larger decrease of serum COMP in the resting group may reflect a lower clearance of COMP from the joint cavity. Serum osteocalcin was temporarily reduced, indicating a reversible suppression of bone formation.},
  author       = {Weitoft, T and Larsson, A and Saxne, Tore and Ronnblom, L},
  issn         = {1468-2060},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {1750--1753},
  publisher    = {British Medical Association},
  series       = {Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases},
  title        = {Changes of cartilage and bone markers after intraarticular glucocorticoid treatment with and without postinjection rest in patients with rheumatoid arthritis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/ard.2004.035022},
  volume       = {64},
  year         = {2005},
}