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Age-related increase in wall stress of the human abdominal aorta: An in vivo study

Astrand, H; Rydén Ahlgren, Åsa LU ; Sandgren, T and Lanne, T (2005) In Journal of Vascular Surgery 42(5). p.926-931
Abstract
Background: The regulation of wall stress in the abdominal aorta (AA) of humans might be of specific interest, because the AA is the most common site for aneurysm formation in which wall stress seems to be an important pathophysiological factor. We studied the age-related changes in wall stress of the AA in healthy subjects, with the common carotid artery (CCA) as a comparison. Methods. A total of 111 healthy subjects were examined with B-mode ultrasonography to determine the lumen diameter and intima-media thickness (IMT) in the AA and the CCA. Results. Aortic IMT was affected by age in men and by both age and lumen diameter in women. Carotid IMT was affected by age and pulse pressure in both men and women. Wall stress was higher in the... (More)
Background: The regulation of wall stress in the abdominal aorta (AA) of humans might be of specific interest, because the AA is the most common site for aneurysm formation in which wall stress seems to be an important pathophysiological factor. We studied the age-related changes in wall stress of the AA in healthy subjects, with the common carotid artery (CCA) as a comparison. Methods. A total of 111 healthy subjects were examined with B-mode ultrasonography to determine the lumen diameter and intima-media thickness (IMT) in the AA and the CCA. Results. Aortic IMT was affected by age in men and by both age and lumen diameter in women. Carotid IMT was affected by age and pulse pressure in both men and women. Wall stress was higher in the AA than in the CCA (P <. 00 1), and men had higher wall stress than women in both the AA (P <.001) and the CCA (P <.05). Furthermore, wall stress was constant during life in the CCA of men and women and in the AA of women. In the male aorta, however, wall stress increased with age (P < 0.01). Conclusions. Arterial diameters increase with age, and a compensatory thickening of the arterial wall prevents the circumferential wall stress from increasing. However, this compensatory response is insufficient in the male AA and results in an increase in stress with age. These findings might explain the propensity for aneurysms to develop in the AA of men. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Vascular Surgery
volume
42
issue
5
pages
926 - 931
publisher
Mosby
external identifiers
  • wos:000233090000023
  • pmid:16275449
  • scopus:27644434834
ISSN
1097-6809
DOI
10.1016/j.jvs.2005.07.010
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7c2b302e-d15b-408c-a4ce-4d3aa0fca4f7 (old id 213811)
date added to LUP
2007-08-02 11:32:17
date last changed
2017-06-18 04:33:37
@article{7c2b302e-d15b-408c-a4ce-4d3aa0fca4f7,
  abstract     = {Background: The regulation of wall stress in the abdominal aorta (AA) of humans might be of specific interest, because the AA is the most common site for aneurysm formation in which wall stress seems to be an important pathophysiological factor. We studied the age-related changes in wall stress of the AA in healthy subjects, with the common carotid artery (CCA) as a comparison. Methods. A total of 111 healthy subjects were examined with B-mode ultrasonography to determine the lumen diameter and intima-media thickness (IMT) in the AA and the CCA. Results. Aortic IMT was affected by age in men and by both age and lumen diameter in women. Carotid IMT was affected by age and pulse pressure in both men and women. Wall stress was higher in the AA than in the CCA (P &lt;. 00 1), and men had higher wall stress than women in both the AA (P &lt;.001) and the CCA (P &lt;.05). Furthermore, wall stress was constant during life in the CCA of men and women and in the AA of women. In the male aorta, however, wall stress increased with age (P &lt; 0.01). Conclusions. Arterial diameters increase with age, and a compensatory thickening of the arterial wall prevents the circumferential wall stress from increasing. However, this compensatory response is insufficient in the male AA and results in an increase in stress with age. These findings might explain the propensity for aneurysms to develop in the AA of men.},
  author       = {Astrand, H and Rydén Ahlgren, Åsa and Sandgren, T and Lanne, T},
  issn         = {1097-6809},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {926--931},
  publisher    = {Mosby},
  series       = {Journal of Vascular Surgery},
  title        = {Age-related increase in wall stress of the human abdominal aorta: An in vivo study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2005.07.010},
  volume       = {42},
  year         = {2005},
}