Advanced

What is the future of primary care research? Probably fairly bright, if we may believe the historical development

Ovhed, I; Van Royen, P and Håkansson, Anders LU (2005) In Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care 23(4). p.248-253
Abstract
Objective. To study one aspect of the development of primary care research from 1975 to 2003. Design. Quantitative bibliometric study. Setting. Pub Med database. Subjects. Four Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden), seven countries from the rest of Europe (Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, and the UK), and seven countries from the rest of the world (Australia, Canada, India, Japan, New Zealand, South Africa, and the USA). Main outcome measures. Number of primary healthcare publications per million inhabitants. Percentage of publications in primary healthcare of all publications in human medicine. Results. In 2003, New Zealand, the UK, and Australia were in the lead, with barely 20 primary care... (More)
Objective. To study one aspect of the development of primary care research from 1975 to 2003. Design. Quantitative bibliometric study. Setting. Pub Med database. Subjects. Four Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden), seven countries from the rest of Europe (Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, and the UK), and seven countries from the rest of the world (Australia, Canada, India, Japan, New Zealand, South Africa, and the USA). Main outcome measures. Number of primary healthcare publications per million inhabitants. Percentage of publications in primary healthcare of all publications in human medicine. Results. In 2003, New Zealand, the UK, and Australia were in the lead, with barely 20 primary care publications per million inhabitants, followed by Norway, Sweden, the Netherlands, and Denmark, where the corresponding figure was around 10. A vigorous increase in publications from 1975 to 2003 was clearly seen in most of the countries. However, during the same period the proportion of publications from primary care in relation to all publications in human medicine was only moderately increased, or virtually unchanged. Conclusion. It is believed that primary care research has a future, and it is hoped it may even be bright. However, searching Pub Med gave but one aspect of the historical development, and in particular the comparisons between countries may be questionable. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
primary health care, family medicine, general practice, Pub Med, research
in
Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care
volume
23
issue
4
pages
248 - 253
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000233046800012
  • pmid:16272075
  • scopus:25844488875
ISSN
0281-3432
DOI
10.1080/02813430500316692
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0d19bc99-e847-4676-b619-4fdf3ec15652 (old id 214124)
date added to LUP
2007-10-05 11:47:30
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:21:30
@article{0d19bc99-e847-4676-b619-4fdf3ec15652,
  abstract     = {Objective. To study one aspect of the development of primary care research from 1975 to 2003. Design. Quantitative bibliometric study. Setting. Pub Med database. Subjects. Four Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden), seven countries from the rest of Europe (Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, and the UK), and seven countries from the rest of the world (Australia, Canada, India, Japan, New Zealand, South Africa, and the USA). Main outcome measures. Number of primary healthcare publications per million inhabitants. Percentage of publications in primary healthcare of all publications in human medicine. Results. In 2003, New Zealand, the UK, and Australia were in the lead, with barely 20 primary care publications per million inhabitants, followed by Norway, Sweden, the Netherlands, and Denmark, where the corresponding figure was around 10. A vigorous increase in publications from 1975 to 2003 was clearly seen in most of the countries. However, during the same period the proportion of publications from primary care in relation to all publications in human medicine was only moderately increased, or virtually unchanged. Conclusion. It is believed that primary care research has a future, and it is hoped it may even be bright. However, searching Pub Med gave but one aspect of the historical development, and in particular the comparisons between countries may be questionable.},
  author       = {Ovhed, I and Van Royen, P and Håkansson, Anders},
  issn         = {0281-3432},
  keyword      = {primary health care,family medicine,general practice,Pub Med,research},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {248--253},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care},
  title        = {What is the future of primary care research? Probably fairly bright, if we may believe the historical development},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02813430500316692},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2005},
}