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The behaviour of satellite cells in response to exercise: what have we learned from human studies?

Kadi, F; Charifi, N; Denis, C; Lexell, Jan LU ; Andersen, J L; Schjerling, P; Olsen, S and Kjaer, M (2005) In Pflügers Archiv 451(2). p.319-327
Abstract
Understanding the complex role played by satellite cells in the adaptive response to exercise in human skeletal muscle has just begun. The development of reliable markers for the identification of satellite cell status (quiescence/activation/proliferation) is an important step towards the understanding of satellite cell behaviour in exercised human muscles. It is hypothesised currently that exercise in humans can induce (1) the activation of satellite cells without proliferation, (2) proliferation and withdrawal from differentiation, (3) proliferation and differentiation to provide myonuclei and (4) proliferation and differentiation to generate new muscle fibres or to repair segmental fibre injuries. In humans, the satellite cell pool can... (More)
Understanding the complex role played by satellite cells in the adaptive response to exercise in human skeletal muscle has just begun. The development of reliable markers for the identification of satellite cell status (quiescence/activation/proliferation) is an important step towards the understanding of satellite cell behaviour in exercised human muscles. It is hypothesised currently that exercise in humans can induce (1) the activation of satellite cells without proliferation, (2) proliferation and withdrawal from differentiation, (3) proliferation and differentiation to provide myonuclei and (4) proliferation and differentiation to generate new muscle fibres or to repair segmental fibre injuries. In humans, the satellite cell pool can increase as early as 4 days following a single bout of exercise and is maintained at higher level following several weeks of training. Cessation of training is associated with a gradual reduction of the previously enhanced satellite cell pool. In the elderly, training counteracts the normal decline in satellite cell number seen with ageing. When the transcriptional activity of existing myonuclei reaches its maximum, daughter cells generated by satellite cell proliferation are involved in protein synthesis by enhancing the number of nuclear domains. Clearly, delineating the events and the mechanisms behind the activation of satellite cells both under physiological and pathological conditions in human skeletal muscles remains an important challenge. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
human, strength training, myonuclei, skeletal muscle, satellite cell biology, hypertrophy, fibre type, aging
in
Pflügers Archiv
volume
451
issue
2
pages
319 - 327
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:16091958
  • wos:000233037100001
  • scopus:27744588587
ISSN
0031-6768
DOI
10.1007/s00424-005-1406-6
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
89575206-0ef0-4135-bc02-37849435b200 (old id 214165)
date added to LUP
2007-09-28 11:13:23
date last changed
2017-08-20 04:17:13
@article{89575206-0ef0-4135-bc02-37849435b200,
  abstract     = {Understanding the complex role played by satellite cells in the adaptive response to exercise in human skeletal muscle has just begun. The development of reliable markers for the identification of satellite cell status (quiescence/activation/proliferation) is an important step towards the understanding of satellite cell behaviour in exercised human muscles. It is hypothesised currently that exercise in humans can induce (1) the activation of satellite cells without proliferation, (2) proliferation and withdrawal from differentiation, (3) proliferation and differentiation to provide myonuclei and (4) proliferation and differentiation to generate new muscle fibres or to repair segmental fibre injuries. In humans, the satellite cell pool can increase as early as 4 days following a single bout of exercise and is maintained at higher level following several weeks of training. Cessation of training is associated with a gradual reduction of the previously enhanced satellite cell pool. In the elderly, training counteracts the normal decline in satellite cell number seen with ageing. When the transcriptional activity of existing myonuclei reaches its maximum, daughter cells generated by satellite cell proliferation are involved in protein synthesis by enhancing the number of nuclear domains. Clearly, delineating the events and the mechanisms behind the activation of satellite cells both under physiological and pathological conditions in human skeletal muscles remains an important challenge.},
  author       = {Kadi, F and Charifi, N and Denis, C and Lexell, Jan and Andersen, J L and Schjerling, P and Olsen, S and Kjaer, M},
  issn         = {0031-6768},
  keyword      = {human,strength training,myonuclei,skeletal muscle,satellite cell biology,hypertrophy,fibre type,aging},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {319--327},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Pflügers Archiv},
  title        = {The behaviour of satellite cells in response to exercise: what have we learned from human studies?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00424-005-1406-6},
  volume       = {451},
  year         = {2005},
}