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The short-term growth response to salt of the developing barley leaf

Fricke, W; Akhiyarova, G; Wei, WX; Alexandersson, Erik LU ; Miller, A; Kjellbom, Per LU ; Richardson, A; Wojciechowski, T; Schreiber, L and Veselov, D, et al. (2006) In Journal of Experimental Botany 57(5). p.1079-1095
Abstract
Recent results concerning the short-term growth response to salinity of the developing barley leaf are reviewed. Plants were grown hydroponically and the growth response of leaf 3 was studied between 10 min and 5 d following addition of 100 mM NaCl to the root medium. The aim of the experiments was to relate changes in variables that are likely to affect cell elongation to changes in leaf growth. Changes in hormone content (ABA, cytokinins), water and solute relationships (osmolality, turgor, water potential, solute concentrations), gene expression (water channel), cuticle deposition, membrane potential, and transpiration were followed, while leaf elongation velocity was monitored. Leaf elongation decreased close to zero within seconds... (More)
Recent results concerning the short-term growth response to salinity of the developing barley leaf are reviewed. Plants were grown hydroponically and the growth response of leaf 3 was studied between 10 min and 5 d following addition of 100 mM NaCl to the root medium. The aim of the experiments was to relate changes in variables that are likely to affect cell elongation to changes in leaf growth. Changes in hormone content (ABA, cytokinins), water and solute relationships (osmolality, turgor, water potential, solute concentrations), gene expression (water channel), cuticle deposition, membrane potential, and transpiration were followed, while leaf elongation velocity was monitored. Leaf elongation decreased close to zero within seconds following addition of NaCl. Between 20 and 30 min after exposure to salt, elongation velocity recovered rather abruptly, to about 46% of the pre-stress level, and remained at the reduced rate for the following 5 d, when it reached about 70% of the level in non-stressed plants. Biophysical and physiological analyses led to three major conclusions. (i) The immediate reduction and sudden recovery in elongation velocity is due to changes in the water potential gradient between leaf xylem and peripheral elongating cells. Changes in transpiration, ABA and cytokinin content, water channel expression, and plasma membrane potential are involved in this response. (ii) Significant solute accumulation, which aids growth recovery, is detectable from 1 h onwards; growing and non-growing leaf regions and mesophyll and epidermis differ in their solute response. (iii) Cuticular wax density is not affected by short-term exposure to salt; transpirational changes are due to stomatal control. (Less)
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publication status
published
subject
keywords
solute and water transport, leaf development, Hordeum vulgare, epidermis, cytokinin, cuticle, cell elongation, Abscisic acid, aquaporin, membrane potential
in
Journal of Experimental Botany
volume
57
issue
5
pages
1079 - 1095
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000236106900006
  • pmid:16513814
  • scopus:33645033776
ISSN
0022-0957
DOI
10.1093/jxb/erj095
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
214ff687-e72a-43bd-b8d5-ab6b69442bbd (old id 415702)
date added to LUP
2007-10-03 07:33:44
date last changed
2019-10-13 03:25:20
@article{214ff687-e72a-43bd-b8d5-ab6b69442bbd,
  abstract     = {Recent results concerning the short-term growth response to salinity of the developing barley leaf are reviewed. Plants were grown hydroponically and the growth response of leaf 3 was studied between 10 min and 5 d following addition of 100 mM NaCl to the root medium. The aim of the experiments was to relate changes in variables that are likely to affect cell elongation to changes in leaf growth. Changes in hormone content (ABA, cytokinins), water and solute relationships (osmolality, turgor, water potential, solute concentrations), gene expression (water channel), cuticle deposition, membrane potential, and transpiration were followed, while leaf elongation velocity was monitored. Leaf elongation decreased close to zero within seconds following addition of NaCl. Between 20 and 30 min after exposure to salt, elongation velocity recovered rather abruptly, to about 46% of the pre-stress level, and remained at the reduced rate for the following 5 d, when it reached about 70% of the level in non-stressed plants. Biophysical and physiological analyses led to three major conclusions. (i) The immediate reduction and sudden recovery in elongation velocity is due to changes in the water potential gradient between leaf xylem and peripheral elongating cells. Changes in transpiration, ABA and cytokinin content, water channel expression, and plasma membrane potential are involved in this response. (ii) Significant solute accumulation, which aids growth recovery, is detectable from 1 h onwards; growing and non-growing leaf regions and mesophyll and epidermis differ in their solute response. (iii) Cuticular wax density is not affected by short-term exposure to salt; transpirational changes are due to stomatal control.},
  author       = {Fricke, W and Akhiyarova, G and Wei, WX and Alexandersson, Erik and Miller, A and Kjellbom, Per and Richardson, A and Wojciechowski, T and Schreiber, L and Veselov, D and Kudoyarova, G and Volkov, V},
  issn         = {0022-0957},
  keyword      = {solute and water transport,leaf development,Hordeum vulgare,epidermis,cytokinin,cuticle,cell elongation,Abscisic acid,aquaporin,membrane potential},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1079--1095},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Journal of Experimental Botany},
  title        = {The short-term growth response to salt of the developing barley leaf},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jxb/erj095},
  volume       = {57},
  year         = {2006},
}