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Dual-signal analysis eliminates requirement for milk sample pretreatment.

Chen, Ying LU ; Andersson, Anneli; Mecklenburg, Michael; Xie, Bin LU and Zhou, Yikai (2011) In Biosensors & Bioelectronics 29(1). p.115-118
Abstract
Detection of analytes in complex biological samples, such as milk and blood, normally requires sample pretreatment. These pretreatment regimes reduce assay throughput and increase testing costs. Technologies that make it possible to eliminate sample pretreatment are of great industrial interest. Here we report the development of a dual-signal flow injected analysis device which eliminates the need for sample pretreatment. The device employs thermal traducers to measure the signal from an enzyme and a reference column. This makes it possible to independently monitor and correct for non-specifically generated heat, thereby eliminating the need for sample pretreatment. The ability of the dual-signal device to determine urea and lactate in... (More)
Detection of analytes in complex biological samples, such as milk and blood, normally requires sample pretreatment. These pretreatment regimes reduce assay throughput and increase testing costs. Technologies that make it possible to eliminate sample pretreatment are of great industrial interest. Here we report the development of a dual-signal flow injected analysis device which eliminates the need for sample pretreatment. The device employs thermal traducers to measure the signal from an enzyme and a reference column. This makes it possible to independently monitor and correct for non-specifically generated heat, thereby eliminating the need for sample pretreatment. The ability of the dual-signal device to determine urea and lactate in milk samples without any prior treatment was evaluated. The spiked milk samples, the urea assay had a linear range from 0.1 to 50mM (R=0.996), and the lactate assay had a linear range from 0.025 to 5.0mM (R=0.9998). The linear regression values for urea and lactate for 0.5%, 1.5% and 3.0% fat milk were at least 0.990. The dual-signal design improves assay reproducibility, accuracy and sensitivity. Addition benefits are shorter assay times and lowers costs, as well as reducing equipment and training requirements. The potential application of the technology for multi-analyte analysis in point of care and decentralized diagnostic testing in healthcare, agriculture and environmental areas is discussed. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Biosensors & Bioelectronics
volume
29
issue
1
pages
115 - 118
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000296174700018
  • pmid:21871791
  • scopus:80053093001
ISSN
1873-4235
DOI
10.1016/j.bios.2011.08.003
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e39cec33-6785-4da6-809a-fcdbc3f3df0d (old id 2150643)
date added to LUP
2011-08-31 11:28:33
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:05:21
@article{e39cec33-6785-4da6-809a-fcdbc3f3df0d,
  abstract     = {Detection of analytes in complex biological samples, such as milk and blood, normally requires sample pretreatment. These pretreatment regimes reduce assay throughput and increase testing costs. Technologies that make it possible to eliminate sample pretreatment are of great industrial interest. Here we report the development of a dual-signal flow injected analysis device which eliminates the need for sample pretreatment. The device employs thermal traducers to measure the signal from an enzyme and a reference column. This makes it possible to independently monitor and correct for non-specifically generated heat, thereby eliminating the need for sample pretreatment. The ability of the dual-signal device to determine urea and lactate in milk samples without any prior treatment was evaluated. The spiked milk samples, the urea assay had a linear range from 0.1 to 50mM (R=0.996), and the lactate assay had a linear range from 0.025 to 5.0mM (R=0.9998). The linear regression values for urea and lactate for 0.5%, 1.5% and 3.0% fat milk were at least 0.990. The dual-signal design improves assay reproducibility, accuracy and sensitivity. Addition benefits are shorter assay times and lowers costs, as well as reducing equipment and training requirements. The potential application of the technology for multi-analyte analysis in point of care and decentralized diagnostic testing in healthcare, agriculture and environmental areas is discussed.},
  author       = {Chen, Ying and Andersson, Anneli and Mecklenburg, Michael and Xie, Bin and Zhou, Yikai},
  issn         = {1873-4235},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {115--118},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Biosensors & Bioelectronics},
  title        = {Dual-signal analysis eliminates requirement for milk sample pretreatment.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2011.08.003},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2011},
}