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Effects of green foam, black foam and gauze on contraction, blood flow and pressure delivery to the wound bed in negative pressure wound therapy.

Malmsjö, Malin LU and Ingemansson, Richard LU (2011) In Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery 64. p.289-296
Abstract
BACKGROUND:

Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) contracts the wound and alters the microvascular blood flow in the wound edge, which may be crucial in promoting wound healing. The aim of the present study was to examine these biological effects in the wound edge using different types of wound fillers.



METHODS:

Wounds were created on the backs of pigs and filled with green foam, black foam or gauze. Dressings for NPWT were then applied. The immediate effects of continuous NPWT, including pressure transmission to the wound bed and microvascular blood flow (using laser Doppler velocimetry), were studied in eight pigs that were anaesthetised for 12 h. In another eight pigs, wound contraction was studied... (More)
BACKGROUND:

Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) contracts the wound and alters the microvascular blood flow in the wound edge, which may be crucial in promoting wound healing. The aim of the present study was to examine these biological effects in the wound edge using different types of wound fillers.



METHODS:

Wounds were created on the backs of pigs and filled with green foam, black foam or gauze. Dressings for NPWT were then applied. The immediate effects of continuous NPWT, including pressure transmission to the wound bed and microvascular blood flow (using laser Doppler velocimetry), were studied in eight pigs that were anaesthetised for 12 h. In another eight pigs, wound contraction was studied during 72 h of NPWT.



RESULTS:

Pressure transduction to the wound bed was similar through green foam, black foam and gauze, with only small pressure drop. Wound contraction was more pronounced for green and black foam than for gauze. Blood flow was found to decrease 0.5 cm from the wound edge and increase 2.5 cm from the wound edge. The increase in blood flow was similar with all wound fillers, while the decrease was less pronounced with gauze than with both foams.



CONCLUSIONS:

The biological effects of NPWT depend on the type of wound filler. Green and black foam have similar effects, while gauze results in less pronounced wound contraction and hypoperfusion. NPWT may be tailored to the individual wound type to optimise the effects and minimise the complications by choosing different wound fillers. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery
volume
64
pages
289 - 296
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000296959000001
  • pmid:21788163
  • scopus:81155131099
ISSN
1878-0539
DOI
10.1016/j.bjps.2011.06.023
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2de71e00-4f05-41de-8baa-4a84890312cb (old id 2151818)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21788163?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-09-04 17:12:21
date last changed
2017-10-22 04:56:17
@article{2de71e00-4f05-41de-8baa-4a84890312cb,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND:<br/><br>
Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) contracts the wound and alters the microvascular blood flow in the wound edge, which may be crucial in promoting wound healing. The aim of the present study was to examine these biological effects in the wound edge using different types of wound fillers.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
METHODS:<br/><br>
Wounds were created on the backs of pigs and filled with green foam, black foam or gauze. Dressings for NPWT were then applied. The immediate effects of continuous NPWT, including pressure transmission to the wound bed and microvascular blood flow (using laser Doppler velocimetry), were studied in eight pigs that were anaesthetised for 12 h. In another eight pigs, wound contraction was studied during 72 h of NPWT.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
RESULTS:<br/><br>
Pressure transduction to the wound bed was similar through green foam, black foam and gauze, with only small pressure drop. Wound contraction was more pronounced for green and black foam than for gauze. Blood flow was found to decrease 0.5 cm from the wound edge and increase 2.5 cm from the wound edge. The increase in blood flow was similar with all wound fillers, while the decrease was less pronounced with gauze than with both foams.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
CONCLUSIONS:<br/><br>
The biological effects of NPWT depend on the type of wound filler. Green and black foam have similar effects, while gauze results in less pronounced wound contraction and hypoperfusion. NPWT may be tailored to the individual wound type to optimise the effects and minimise the complications by choosing different wound fillers.},
  author       = {Malmsjö, Malin and Ingemansson, Richard},
  issn         = {1878-0539},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {289--296},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery},
  title        = {Effects of green foam, black foam and gauze on contraction, blood flow and pressure delivery to the wound bed in negative pressure wound therapy.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjps.2011.06.023},
  volume       = {64},
  year         = {2011},
}