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Improved minimal residual disease detection by targeted quantitative polymerase chain reaction in Nucleophosmin 1 type a mutated acute myeloid leukemia

Pettersson, Louise LU ; Levéen, Per LU ; Axler, Olof LU ; Dvorakova, Dana; Juliusson, Gunnar LU and Ehinger, Mats LU (2016) In Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer 55(10). p.750-766
Abstract

Multicolor flow cytometry (MFC) and real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) are important independent techniques to determine minimal residual disease (MRD) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). MFC is the standard method, but may be unreliable. Therefore, MFC-based determination of MRD with an RQ-PCR-based approach targeting the nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) type A mutation was set out to compare. Since most current NPM1 RQ-PCR MRD protocols suffer from clear definitions of quantifiability, we sought to define quantifiability in a reproducible and standardized manner. The limit of quantifiability of our RQ-PCR protocol for the NPM1 type A mutation varied between 0.002% and 0.04% residual leukemic cells depending on the features of the standard curve... (More)

Multicolor flow cytometry (MFC) and real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) are important independent techniques to determine minimal residual disease (MRD) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). MFC is the standard method, but may be unreliable. Therefore, MFC-based determination of MRD with an RQ-PCR-based approach targeting the nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) type A mutation was set out to compare. Since most current NPM1 RQ-PCR MRD protocols suffer from clear definitions of quantifiability, we sought to define quantifiability in a reproducible and standardized manner. The limit of quantifiability of our RQ-PCR protocol for the NPM1 type A mutation varied between 0.002% and 0.04% residual leukemic cells depending on the features of the standard curve for each PCR experiment. The limit of detection was close to 0.001% leukemic cells. The limit of detection by MFC ranged from 0.01% to 1% depending on the phenotype of the leukemic cells as compared with non-leukemic bone marrow cells. Forty-five MRD samples from 15 patients using both NPM1 mutation specific RQ-PCR and MFC were analyzed. In 32 of the 45 samples (71%), an MRD-signal could be detected with RQ-PCR. A quantifiable NPM1 mutation signal was found in 15 samples (33%) (range 0.003%–2.6% leukemic cells). By contrast, only two follow-up samples (4%) showed residual leukemic cells (0.04% and 0.3%, respectively) by MFC. Thus, RQ-PCR of the NPM1 type A mutation was more sensitive and reliable than MFC for determination of MRD, which might have clinical implications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer
volume
55
issue
10
pages
17 pages
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • scopus:84981223740
ISSN
1045-2257
DOI
10.1002/gcc.22375
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
216d4ead-72f3-491d-9740-c7fc4a869e5d
date added to LUP
2016-09-01 14:51:31
date last changed
2017-01-09 12:27:14
@article{216d4ead-72f3-491d-9740-c7fc4a869e5d,
  abstract     = {<p>Multicolor flow cytometry (MFC) and real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) are important independent techniques to determine minimal residual disease (MRD) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). MFC is the standard method, but may be unreliable. Therefore, MFC-based determination of MRD with an RQ-PCR-based approach targeting the nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) type A mutation was set out to compare. Since most current NPM1 RQ-PCR MRD protocols suffer from clear definitions of quantifiability, we sought to define quantifiability in a reproducible and standardized manner. The limit of quantifiability of our RQ-PCR protocol for the NPM1 type A mutation varied between 0.002% and 0.04% residual leukemic cells depending on the features of the standard curve for each PCR experiment. The limit of detection was close to 0.001% leukemic cells. The limit of detection by MFC ranged from 0.01% to 1% depending on the phenotype of the leukemic cells as compared with non-leukemic bone marrow cells. Forty-five MRD samples from 15 patients using both NPM1 mutation specific RQ-PCR and MFC were analyzed. In 32 of the 45 samples (71%), an MRD-signal could be detected with RQ-PCR. A quantifiable NPM1 mutation signal was found in 15 samples (33%) (range 0.003%–2.6% leukemic cells). By contrast, only two follow-up samples (4%) showed residual leukemic cells (0.04% and 0.3%, respectively) by MFC. Thus, RQ-PCR of the NPM1 type A mutation was more sensitive and reliable than MFC for determination of MRD, which might have clinical implications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.</p>},
  author       = {Pettersson, Louise and Levéen, Per and Axler, Olof and Dvorakova, Dana and Juliusson, Gunnar and Ehinger, Mats},
  issn         = {1045-2257},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {10},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {750--766},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer},
  title        = {Improved minimal residual disease detection by targeted quantitative polymerase chain reaction in Nucleophosmin 1 type a mutated acute myeloid leukemia},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/gcc.22375},
  volume       = {55},
  year         = {2016},
}