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Das Farbensehen der Tiere : Von farbenblinden Seehunden und tetrachromatischen Vögeln

Scholtyssek, Christine and Kelber, Almut LU (2017) In Der Ophthalmologe 114(11). p.978-985
Abstract
Background
The colors in which we see an object are not only dependent on the spectral composition of the reflected light but also represent an interpretation by our eyes and the trichromatic visual system.

Objective
How do animals of other species see the world?

Results
The majority of mammals do not have three but only two types of cones and therefore have dichromatic color vision. Marine mammals and some nocturnally active mammals even have only one type of cone and are completely color blind. In contrast, birds as well as many fish and reptiles see in the world in more color hues and with four types of cones. Many vertebrates, insects and crustaceans can see not only the spectrum perceived by us but also... (More)
Background
The colors in which we see an object are not only dependent on the spectral composition of the reflected light but also represent an interpretation by our eyes and the trichromatic visual system.

Objective
How do animals of other species see the world?

Results
The majority of mammals do not have three but only two types of cones and therefore have dichromatic color vision. Marine mammals and some nocturnally active mammals even have only one type of cone and are completely color blind. In contrast, birds as well as many fish and reptiles see in the world in more color hues and with four types of cones. Many vertebrates, insects and crustaceans can see not only the spectrum perceived by us but also ultraviolet radiation as light.

Conclusion
In order to understand how animals of other species see the world, their visual systems must be understood and the animals must be tested in behavioral investigations.
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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
alternative title
Color vision in animals From color blind seals to tetrachromatic vision in birds : From color blind seals to tetrachromatic vision in birds
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cones, retinal , Retina, Light spectrum, UV radiation, Twilight vision
in
Der Ophthalmologe
volume
114
issue
11
pages
978 - 985
external identifiers
  • scopus:85026908811
DOI
10.1007/s00347-017-0543-6
language
German
LU publication?
yes
id
217407e9-8a1e-45a6-ae0f-891b2abd5038
date added to LUP
2017-11-13 20:01:14
date last changed
2018-01-07 12:25:40
@article{217407e9-8a1e-45a6-ae0f-891b2abd5038,
  abstract     = {Background<br/>The colors in which we see an object are not only dependent on the spectral composition of the reflected light but also represent an interpretation by our eyes and the trichromatic visual system.<br/><br/>Objective<br/>How do animals of other species see the world?<br/><br/>Results<br/>The majority of mammals do not have three but only two types of cones and therefore have dichromatic color vision. Marine mammals and some nocturnally active mammals even have only one type of cone and are completely color blind. In contrast, birds as well as many fish and reptiles see in the world in more color hues and with four types of cones. Many vertebrates, insects and crustaceans can see not only the spectrum perceived by us but also ultraviolet radiation as light.<br/><br/>Conclusion<br/>In order to understand how animals of other species see the world, their visual systems must be understood and the animals must be tested in behavioral investigations.<br/>},
  author       = {Scholtyssek, Christine and Kelber, Almut},
  keyword      = {Cones, retinal ,Retina,Light spectrum,UV radiation,Twilight vision},
  language     = {ger},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {978--985},
  series       = {Der Ophthalmologe },
  title        = {Das Farbensehen der Tiere : Von farbenblinden Seehunden und tetrachromatischen Vögeln},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00347-017-0543-6},
  volume       = {114},
  year         = {2017},
}