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Mobility and mobility-related participation outcomes of powered wheelchair and scooter interventions after 4-months and 1-year use.

Löfqvist, Charlotte LU ; Pettersson, Cecilia LU ; Iwarsson, Susanne LU and Brandt, Åse LU (2012) In Disability and rehabilitation. Assistive technology 7(3). p.211-218
Abstract
Purpose: The aim was to investigate outcomes of powered wheelchair and scooter interventions after 4-months and 1-year use regarding need for assistance when moving around, frequency of mobility-related participation, easiness/difficulty in mobility during participation, and number of participation aspects performed in everyday life. Method: The study was a prospective cohort study, using an instrument focusing on mobility-related participation outcomes of mobility device interventions (NOMO 1.0), at baseline, after 4-months and 1-year use. Results: The results show that the outcomes in terms of participation frequency and easiness in mobility occur in a short time perspective, and that the effects remained stable at 1-year follow-up. The... (More)
Purpose: The aim was to investigate outcomes of powered wheelchair and scooter interventions after 4-months and 1-year use regarding need for assistance when moving around, frequency of mobility-related participation, easiness/difficulty in mobility during participation, and number of participation aspects performed in everyday life. Method: The study was a prospective cohort study, using an instrument focusing on mobility-related participation outcomes of mobility device interventions (NOMO 1.0), at baseline, after 4-months and 1-year use. Results: The results show that the outcomes in terms of participation frequency and easiness in mobility occur in a short time perspective, and that the effects remained stable at 1-year follow-up. The frequency of going for a walk increased most prominently (26%). Even though the majority of the participation aspects were not performed, more often they became easier to perform: 56-91% found that shopping, walking and visiting family/friends were easier. Moreover, independence outdoors and indoors increased. Conclusions: This small study provides knowledge about the outcomes of powered wheelchairs and scooters in terms of mobility and mobility-related participation in real-life situations. The study supports results from former studies, but even so, larger studies are required in order to provide evidence for the effectiveness of powered wheelchairs and scooters. [Box: see text]. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Disability and rehabilitation. Assistive technology
volume
7
issue
3
pages
211 - 218
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • pmid:21980966
  • scopus:84859550173
ISSN
1748-3115
DOI
10.3109/17483107.2011.619224
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
521315c9-c36a-44af-847e-0d3ae31b1358 (old id 2200744)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21980966?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-11-02 08:43:03
date last changed
2017-10-01 04:09:35
@article{521315c9-c36a-44af-847e-0d3ae31b1358,
  abstract     = {Purpose: The aim was to investigate outcomes of powered wheelchair and scooter interventions after 4-months and 1-year use regarding need for assistance when moving around, frequency of mobility-related participation, easiness/difficulty in mobility during participation, and number of participation aspects performed in everyday life. Method: The study was a prospective cohort study, using an instrument focusing on mobility-related participation outcomes of mobility device interventions (NOMO 1.0), at baseline, after 4-months and 1-year use. Results: The results show that the outcomes in terms of participation frequency and easiness in mobility occur in a short time perspective, and that the effects remained stable at 1-year follow-up. The frequency of going for a walk increased most prominently (26%). Even though the majority of the participation aspects were not performed, more often they became easier to perform: 56-91% found that shopping, walking and visiting family/friends were easier. Moreover, independence outdoors and indoors increased. Conclusions: This small study provides knowledge about the outcomes of powered wheelchairs and scooters in terms of mobility and mobility-related participation in real-life situations. The study supports results from former studies, but even so, larger studies are required in order to provide evidence for the effectiveness of powered wheelchairs and scooters. [Box: see text].},
  author       = {Löfqvist, Charlotte and Pettersson, Cecilia and Iwarsson, Susanne and Brandt, Åse},
  issn         = {1748-3115},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {211--218},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Disability and rehabilitation. Assistive technology},
  title        = {Mobility and mobility-related participation outcomes of powered wheelchair and scooter interventions after 4-months and 1-year use.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/17483107.2011.619224},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2012},
}