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Effects of form familiarity on perception of words, pseudowords and nonwords in the two cerebral hemispheres

Jordan, Timothy; Redwood, Michelle and Patching, Geoffrey LU (2003) In Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 15(4). p.537-548
Abstract
Previous investigations of hemispheric processes of word perception provide a mixed picture of the sensitivity of each hemisphere to the familiarity of the visual form of lateralized displays. We investigated this issue by presenting words, pseudowords, and nonwords briefly to either the left (LH) or right (RH) hemisphere in lowercase, uppercase, and a matched, unfamiliar mixed-case form, and used an eye tracker to ensure central fixation and the Reicher–Wheeler task to suppress influences of stimulus asymmetry. Familiarity of form exerted a substantial effect on perception. In particular, perception of LH and RH displays of words, pseudowords, and nonwords was least accurate for mixed case, intermediate for upper case, and most accurate... (More)
Previous investigations of hemispheric processes of word perception provide a mixed picture of the sensitivity of each hemisphere to the familiarity of the visual form of lateralized displays. We investigated this issue by presenting words, pseudowords, and nonwords briefly to either the left (LH) or right (RH) hemisphere in lowercase, uppercase, and a matched, unfamiliar mixed-case form, and used an eye tracker to ensure central fixation and the Reicher–Wheeler task to suppress influences of stimulus asymmetry. Familiarity of form exerted a substantial effect on perception. In particular, perception of LH and RH displays of words, pseudowords, and nonwords was least accurate for mixed case, intermediate for upper case, and most accurate for lowercase. However, form had no effect on the LH advantage observed for words, pseudowords, and nonwords, indicating that form affected processing in both hemispheres to a similar extent. Moreover, LH and RH displays both showed that mixed case disrupted performance most for words, and more for pseudowords than for nonwords, indicating the sensitivity to form shown by each hemisphere reflected more than a general perceptual process. Implications for the role of form familiarity in hemispheric processing of words are discussed. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
volume
15
issue
4
pages
537 - 548
publisher
MIT Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:0038743238
ISSN
1530-8898
DOI
10.1162/089892903321662921
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
e72d50c1-7596-4efa-af58-918487166c43 (old id 2205431)
date added to LUP
2011-12-16 09:51:07
date last changed
2018-05-29 12:31:13
@article{e72d50c1-7596-4efa-af58-918487166c43,
  abstract     = {Previous investigations of hemispheric processes of word perception provide a mixed picture of the sensitivity of each hemisphere to the familiarity of the visual form of lateralized displays. We investigated this issue by presenting words, pseudowords, and nonwords briefly to either the left (LH) or right (RH) hemisphere in lowercase, uppercase, and a matched, unfamiliar mixed-case form, and used an eye tracker to ensure central fixation and the Reicher–Wheeler task to suppress influences of stimulus asymmetry. Familiarity of form exerted a substantial effect on perception. In particular, perception of LH and RH displays of words, pseudowords, and nonwords was least accurate for mixed case, intermediate for upper case, and most accurate for lowercase. However, form had no effect on the LH advantage observed for words, pseudowords, and nonwords, indicating that form affected processing in both hemispheres to a similar extent. Moreover, LH and RH displays both showed that mixed case disrupted performance most for words, and more for pseudowords than for nonwords, indicating the sensitivity to form shown by each hemisphere reflected more than a general perceptual process. Implications for the role of form familiarity in hemispheric processing of words are discussed.},
  author       = {Jordan, Timothy and Redwood, Michelle and Patching, Geoffrey},
  issn         = {1530-8898},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {537--548},
  publisher    = {MIT Press},
  series       = {Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience},
  title        = {Effects of form familiarity on perception of words, pseudowords and nonwords in the two cerebral hemispheres},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1162/089892903321662921},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2003},
}