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Cross-modal integration of simple auditory and visual events

Patching, Geoffrey LU and Quinlan, Philip (2004) In Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics 66(1). p.131-140
Abstract
Responses are typically faster and more accurate when both auditory and visual modalities are stimulated than when only one is. This bimodal advantage is generally attributed to a speeding of responding on bimodal trials, relative to unimodal trials. It remains possible that this effect might be due to a performance decrement on unimodal ones. To investigate this, two levels of auditory and visual signal intensities were combined in a double-factorial paradigm. Responses to the onset of the imperative signal were measured under go/no-go conditions. Mean reaction times to the four types of bimodal stimuli exhibited a superadditive interaction. This is evidence for the parallel self-terminating processing of the two signal components.... (More)
Responses are typically faster and more accurate when both auditory and visual modalities are stimulated than when only one is. This bimodal advantage is generally attributed to a speeding of responding on bimodal trials, relative to unimodal trials. It remains possible that this effect might be due to a performance decrement on unimodal ones. To investigate this, two levels of auditory and visual signal intensities were combined in a double-factorial paradigm. Responses to the onset of the imperative signal were measured under go/no-go conditions. Mean reaction times to the four types of bimodal stimuli exhibited a superadditive interaction. This is evidence for the parallel self-terminating processing of the two signal components. Violations of the race model inequality also occurred, and measures of processing capacity showed that efficiency was greater on the bimodal than on the unimodal trials. These data are discussed in terms of a possible underlying neural substrate. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics
volume
66
issue
1
pages
131 - 140
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:2142755406
DOI
10.3758/BF03194867
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
777d001b-3639-43f6-95d7-b2641707a91c (old id 2205460)
date added to LUP
2011-12-16 11:15:29
date last changed
2017-01-01 08:07:54
@article{777d001b-3639-43f6-95d7-b2641707a91c,
  abstract     = {Responses are typically faster and more accurate when both auditory and visual modalities are stimulated than when only one is. This bimodal advantage is generally attributed to a speeding of responding on bimodal trials, relative to unimodal trials. It remains possible that this effect might be due to a performance decrement on unimodal ones. To investigate this, two levels of auditory and visual signal intensities were combined in a double-factorial paradigm. Responses to the onset of the imperative signal were measured under go/no-go conditions. Mean reaction times to the four types of bimodal stimuli exhibited a superadditive interaction. This is evidence for the parallel self-terminating processing of the two signal components. Violations of the race model inequality also occurred, and measures of processing capacity showed that efficiency was greater on the bimodal than on the unimodal trials. These data are discussed in terms of a possible underlying neural substrate.},
  author       = {Patching, Geoffrey and Quinlan, Philip},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {131--140},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics},
  title        = {Cross-modal integration of simple auditory and visual events},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/BF03194867},
  volume       = {66},
  year         = {2004},
}