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Evidence-based recommendations for negative pressure wound therapy: Treatment variables (pressure levels, wound filler and contact layer) - Steps towards an international consensus

Birke-Sorensen, H.; Malmsjö, Malin LU ; Rome, P.; Hudson, D.; Krug, E.; Berg, L.; Bruhin, A.; Caravaggi, C.; Chariker, M. and Depoorter, M., et al. (2011) In Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery 64. p.1-16
Abstract
Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is becoming a commonplace treatment in many clinical settings. New devices and dressings are being introduced. Despite widespread adoption, there remains uncertainty regarding several aspects of NPWT use. To respond to these gaps, a global expert panel was convened to develop evidence-based recommendations describing the use of NPWT. In a previous communication, we have reviewed the evidence base for the use of NPWT within trauma and reconstructive surgery. In this communication, we present results of the assessment of evidence relating to the different NPWT treatment variables: different wound fillers (principally foam and gauze); when to use a wound contact layer; different pressure settings; and... (More)
Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is becoming a commonplace treatment in many clinical settings. New devices and dressings are being introduced. Despite widespread adoption, there remains uncertainty regarding several aspects of NPWT use. To respond to these gaps, a global expert panel was convened to develop evidence-based recommendations describing the use of NPWT. In a previous communication, we have reviewed the evidence base for the use of NPWT within trauma and reconstructive surgery. In this communication, we present results of the assessment of evidence relating to the different NPWT treatment variables: different wound fillers (principally foam and gauze); when to use a wound contact layer; different pressure settings; and the impact of NPWT on bacterial bioburden. Evidence-based recommendations were obtained by a systematic review of the literature, grading of evidence and drafting of the recommendations by a global expert panel. Evidence and recommendations were graded according to the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) classification system. In general, there is relatively weak evidence on which to base recommendations for any one NPWT treatment variable over another. Overall, 14 recommendations were developed: five for the choice of wound filler and wound contact layer, four for choice of pressure setting and five for use of NPWT in infected wounds. With respect to bioburden, evidence suggests that reduction of bacteria in wounds is not a major mode of action of NPWT. (C) 2011 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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keywords
Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT), Recommendations, Systematic, review, Consensus, NPWT wound-filler materials, Negative pressure level
in
Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery
volume
64
pages
1 - 16
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000296050500001
  • scopus:84860390255
ISSN
1878-0539
DOI
10.1016/j.bjps.2011.06.001
language
English
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yes
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565a3eee-88eb-4926-a74a-3128f6cd7516 (old id 2208262)
date added to LUP
2011-12-01 08:29:06
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:23:00
@article{565a3eee-88eb-4926-a74a-3128f6cd7516,
  abstract     = {Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is becoming a commonplace treatment in many clinical settings. New devices and dressings are being introduced. Despite widespread adoption, there remains uncertainty regarding several aspects of NPWT use. To respond to these gaps, a global expert panel was convened to develop evidence-based recommendations describing the use of NPWT. In a previous communication, we have reviewed the evidence base for the use of NPWT within trauma and reconstructive surgery. In this communication, we present results of the assessment of evidence relating to the different NPWT treatment variables: different wound fillers (principally foam and gauze); when to use a wound contact layer; different pressure settings; and the impact of NPWT on bacterial bioburden. Evidence-based recommendations were obtained by a systematic review of the literature, grading of evidence and drafting of the recommendations by a global expert panel. Evidence and recommendations were graded according to the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) classification system. In general, there is relatively weak evidence on which to base recommendations for any one NPWT treatment variable over another. Overall, 14 recommendations were developed: five for the choice of wound filler and wound contact layer, four for choice of pressure setting and five for use of NPWT in infected wounds. With respect to bioburden, evidence suggests that reduction of bacteria in wounds is not a major mode of action of NPWT. (C) 2011 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Birke-Sorensen, H. and Malmsjö, Malin and Rome, P. and Hudson, D. and Krug, E. and Berg, L. and Bruhin, A. and Caravaggi, C. and Chariker, M. and Depoorter, M. and Dowsett, C. and Dunn, R. and Duteille, F. and Ferreira, F. and Francos Martinez, J. M. and Grudzien, G. and Ichioka, S. and Ingemansson, Richard and Jeffery, S. and Lee, C. and Vig, S. and Runkel, N. and Martin, R. and Smith, J.},
  issn         = {1878-0539},
  keyword      = {Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT),Recommendations,Systematic,review,Consensus,NPWT wound-filler materials,Negative pressure level},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1--16},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery},
  title        = {Evidence-based recommendations for negative pressure wound therapy: Treatment variables (pressure levels, wound filler and contact layer) - Steps towards an international consensus},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjps.2011.06.001},
  volume       = {64},
  year         = {2011},
}