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Dietary Shifts and Human Health: Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease in a Sustainable World.

Lindeberg, Staffan LU (2011) In Journal of Gastrointestinal Cancer
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Increasing evidence suggests that optimal food choice is critical for sizable prevention of western diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. The Mediterranean diet is an important step in this direction. Moreover, substantially lower rates of Western disease, even compared to Mediterranean countries, have been observed among hunter-gatherers and other non-western populations (Lindeberg 2010). Observational studies and controlled trials support the notion that an evolutionary perspective is helpful when designing food models for optimal human health. DISCUSSION: However, sustainable health for the individual patient is not enough: environmental sustainability must also be considered. Are fish and fruit sustainable... (More)
INTRODUCTION: Increasing evidence suggests that optimal food choice is critical for sizable prevention of western diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. The Mediterranean diet is an important step in this direction. Moreover, substantially lower rates of Western disease, even compared to Mediterranean countries, have been observed among hunter-gatherers and other non-western populations (Lindeberg 2010). Observational studies and controlled trials support the notion that an evolutionary perspective is helpful when designing food models for optimal human health. DISCUSSION: However, sustainable health for the individual patient is not enough: environmental sustainability must also be considered. Are fish and fruit sustainable for everyone? Are starchy root vegetables a better option than cereal grains? Is locally produced meat an underestimated wholesome food? These and other questions need to be addressed in order to cut greenhouse gases and the consumption of (blue) water and nonrenewable energy. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
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in
Journal of Gastrointestinal Cancer
publisher
Humana Press
external identifiers
  • pmid:22081408
  • scopus:84857798564
ISSN
1941-6636
DOI
10.1007/s12029-011-9345-2
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6e097a6c-4c8f-4968-aeb0-8a5c6d8d3313 (old id 2220781)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22081408?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-12-02 21:42:18
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:32:30
@article{6e097a6c-4c8f-4968-aeb0-8a5c6d8d3313,
  abstract     = {INTRODUCTION: Increasing evidence suggests that optimal food choice is critical for sizable prevention of western diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. The Mediterranean diet is an important step in this direction. Moreover, substantially lower rates of Western disease, even compared to Mediterranean countries, have been observed among hunter-gatherers and other non-western populations (Lindeberg 2010). Observational studies and controlled trials support the notion that an evolutionary perspective is helpful when designing food models for optimal human health. DISCUSSION: However, sustainable health for the individual patient is not enough: environmental sustainability must also be considered. Are fish and fruit sustainable for everyone? Are starchy root vegetables a better option than cereal grains? Is locally produced meat an underestimated wholesome food? These and other questions need to be addressed in order to cut greenhouse gases and the consumption of (blue) water and nonrenewable energy.},
  author       = {Lindeberg, Staffan},
  issn         = {1941-6636},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {11},
  publisher    = {Humana Press},
  series       = {Journal of Gastrointestinal Cancer},
  title        = {Dietary Shifts and Human Health: Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease in a Sustainable World.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12029-011-9345-2},
  year         = {2011},
}