Advanced

Low prevalence of Haemoproteus infections in Chiffchaffs.

Bensch, Staffan LU ; Jönsson, Jane LU and Copete, José Luis (2012) In Parasitology 139. p.302-309
Abstract
SUMMARY: Parasite prevalence is an important variable in many evolutionary and ecological studies. In birds, haemosporidian blood parasites have been in focus of many comparative analyses. Because low prevalence is difficult to estimate precisely and that studies finding low prevalence are more likely to remain unpublished, our knowledge of parasite prevalence is biased towards highly infected taxa. Species with naturally low levels of infection are nonetheless interesting as they may provide models for studying the evolution of pathogen resistance. In the present study we show that the prevalence of Haemoproteus parasites is markedly lower in several taxa within the widely distributed chiffchaff species-complex compared to other species... (More)
SUMMARY: Parasite prevalence is an important variable in many evolutionary and ecological studies. In birds, haemosporidian blood parasites have been in focus of many comparative analyses. Because low prevalence is difficult to estimate precisely and that studies finding low prevalence are more likely to remain unpublished, our knowledge of parasite prevalence is biased towards highly infected taxa. Species with naturally low levels of infection are nonetheless interesting as they may provide models for studying the evolution of pathogen resistance. In the present study we show that the prevalence of Haemoproteus parasites is markedly lower in several taxa within the widely distributed chiffchaff species-complex compared to other species within the genus Phylloscopus. Since chiffchaffs, P. collybita, commonly coexists in the same habitat as congeners frequently infected with Haemoproteus parasites, immediate ecological variables like abundance of vectors can hardly explain this difference. Some of the parasites infecting coexisting congeners are broad host generalists leaving it enigmatic why chiffchaffs are almost free of Haemoproteus infections. We propose that detailed infection experiments are needed to illuminate whether chiffchaffs possess a genetic immunity against Haemoproteus parasites or if other more subtle ecological processes, like anti-vector behaviour, play a role in its generally low level of infestation. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Plasmodium, Phylloscopus collybita, Haemoproteus, prevalence, Leucocytozoon
in
Parasitology
volume
139
pages
302 - 309
publisher
Cambridge University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000300254600003
  • pmid:22076045
  • scopus:84858807232
ISSN
1469-8161
DOI
10.1017/S0031182011002009
project
Malaria in birds
BECC
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9861506f-c261-499f-9563-f5d0fc53ed9f (old id 2220898)
date added to LUP
2011-12-05 12:24:19
date last changed
2017-01-08 03:19:15
@article{9861506f-c261-499f-9563-f5d0fc53ed9f,
  abstract     = {SUMMARY: Parasite prevalence is an important variable in many evolutionary and ecological studies. In birds, haemosporidian blood parasites have been in focus of many comparative analyses. Because low prevalence is difficult to estimate precisely and that studies finding low prevalence are more likely to remain unpublished, our knowledge of parasite prevalence is biased towards highly infected taxa. Species with naturally low levels of infection are nonetheless interesting as they may provide models for studying the evolution of pathogen resistance. In the present study we show that the prevalence of Haemoproteus parasites is markedly lower in several taxa within the widely distributed chiffchaff species-complex compared to other species within the genus Phylloscopus. Since chiffchaffs, P. collybita, commonly coexists in the same habitat as congeners frequently infected with Haemoproteus parasites, immediate ecological variables like abundance of vectors can hardly explain this difference. Some of the parasites infecting coexisting congeners are broad host generalists leaving it enigmatic why chiffchaffs are almost free of Haemoproteus infections. We propose that detailed infection experiments are needed to illuminate whether chiffchaffs possess a genetic immunity against Haemoproteus parasites or if other more subtle ecological processes, like anti-vector behaviour, play a role in its generally low level of infestation.},
  author       = {Bensch, Staffan and Jönsson, Jane and Copete, José Luis},
  issn         = {1469-8161},
  keyword      = {Plasmodium,Phylloscopus collybita,Haemoproteus,prevalence,Leucocytozoon},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {302--309},
  publisher    = {Cambridge University Press},
  series       = {Parasitology},
  title        = {Low prevalence of Haemoproteus infections in Chiffchaffs.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0031182011002009},
  volume       = {139},
  year         = {2012},
}