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Older patients with acute myeloid leukemia benefit from intensive chemotherapy: an update from the Swedish acute leukemia registry.

Juliusson, Gunnar LU (2011) In Clinical Lymphoma, Myeloma & Leukemia 11 Suppl 1. p.54-59
Abstract
Most patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are older, the median age is 71 years, and survival decreases rapidly with age. The achievement of complete remission and long-term survival mostly require intensive combination chemotherapy, but standard regimens are often believed to be too toxic for older patients. The Swedish Acute Leukemia Registry is unique and contains data on 98% of all patients diagnosed since 1997, irrespective of management. Comorbidity increases with age, but the distribution of AML-related risk factors is mostly similar in different age groups of patients older than 60 years old. In Sweden, most patients up to 75 years old are given intensive induction treatment with acceptable complete remission rates. Early... (More)
Most patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are older, the median age is 71 years, and survival decreases rapidly with age. The achievement of complete remission and long-term survival mostly require intensive combination chemotherapy, but standard regimens are often believed to be too toxic for older patients. The Swedish Acute Leukemia Registry is unique and contains data on 98% of all patients diagnosed since 1997, irrespective of management. Comorbidity increases with age, but the distribution of AML-related risk factors is mostly similar in different age groups of patients older than 60 years old. In Sweden, most patients up to 75 years old are given intensive induction treatment with acceptable complete remission rates. Early death rates were always lower with intensive treatment compared with palliative treatment, thus, most patients up to 75 years and with AML both tolerate and benefit from intensive induction treatment. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Clinical Lymphoma, Myeloma & Leukemia
volume
11 Suppl 1
pages
54 - 59
publisher
CIG Media Group
external identifiers
  • pmid:22035749
  • scopus:84860329358
ISSN
2152-2650
DOI
10.1016/j.clml.2011.02.003
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
910cf888-ba07-4bc3-ab2d-2fd8563321b6 (old id 2221070)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22035749?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-12-02 19:32:35
date last changed
2017-11-19 04:16:39
@article{910cf888-ba07-4bc3-ab2d-2fd8563321b6,
  abstract     = {Most patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are older, the median age is 71 years, and survival decreases rapidly with age. The achievement of complete remission and long-term survival mostly require intensive combination chemotherapy, but standard regimens are often believed to be too toxic for older patients. The Swedish Acute Leukemia Registry is unique and contains data on 98% of all patients diagnosed since 1997, irrespective of management. Comorbidity increases with age, but the distribution of AML-related risk factors is mostly similar in different age groups of patients older than 60 years old. In Sweden, most patients up to 75 years old are given intensive induction treatment with acceptable complete remission rates. Early death rates were always lower with intensive treatment compared with palliative treatment, thus, most patients up to 75 years and with AML both tolerate and benefit from intensive induction treatment.},
  author       = {Juliusson, Gunnar},
  issn         = {2152-2650},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {54--59},
  publisher    = {CIG Media Group},
  series       = {Clinical Lymphoma, Myeloma & Leukemia},
  title        = {Older patients with acute myeloid leukemia benefit from intensive chemotherapy: an update from the Swedish acute leukemia registry.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clml.2011.02.003},
  volume       = {11 Suppl 1},
  year         = {2011},
}