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Water Crisis in The Middle East: An Opportunity for New Forms of Water Governance and Peace

Wessels, Joshka LU (2009) In The Whitehead Journal of Diplomacy and International Relations 10(2). p.131-142
Abstract
The Middle East, home to 6.3 percent of the world’s population and containing only 1.4 percent of the world’s renewable fresh water, is experiencing an increasing water scarcity crisis.1 The UN presented an alarming report during the last World Water Forum in March 2009 painting a bleak picture of increasing demand and diminishing water supplies.2 Scientifically, the Middle East ran out of water in the 1970s, by then the overall demand for water was more than the resource could provide. A situation affecting millions of individuals.3 The Middle East is the most water-scarce region in the world.4 In 1955, three Arab countries suffered water scarcity; today, that number is eleven and scholars predict seven more nations joining the list by... (More)
The Middle East, home to 6.3 percent of the world’s population and containing only 1.4 percent of the world’s renewable fresh water, is experiencing an increasing water scarcity crisis.1 The UN presented an alarming report during the last World Water Forum in March 2009 painting a bleak picture of increasing demand and diminishing water supplies.2 Scientifically, the Middle East ran out of water in the 1970s, by then the overall demand for water was more than the resource could provide. A situation affecting millions of individuals.3 The Middle East is the most water-scarce region in the world.4 In 1955, three Arab countries suffered water scarcity; today, that number is eleven and scholars predict seven more nations joining the list by 2025.5 While population growth plays a huge role in the increased demand, the agricultural sector accounts for more than 70 percent of water use throughout the region. The introduction of pumpwells and massive irrigation schemes nearly doubled the amount of irrigated land between 1965 and 1997.6 (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
The Whitehead Journal of Diplomacy and International Relations
volume
10
issue
2
pages
131 - 142
publisher
Seton Hall University
ISSN
1538-6589
project
Cooperation and Conflict over the Jordan River
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
14170490-4155-48fc-81e3-398651f7eb53 (old id 2254833)
alternative location
http://law-journals-books.vlex.com/vid/middle-east-opportunity-governance-peace-227840679
date added to LUP
2011-12-19 18:18:56
date last changed
2017-06-22 09:25:19
@article{14170490-4155-48fc-81e3-398651f7eb53,
  abstract     = {The Middle East, home to 6.3 percent of the world’s population and containing only 1.4 percent of the world’s renewable fresh water, is experiencing an increasing water scarcity crisis.1 The UN presented an alarming report during the last World Water Forum in March 2009 painting a bleak picture of increasing demand and diminishing water supplies.2 Scientifically, the Middle East ran out of water in the 1970s, by then the overall demand for water was more than the resource could provide. A situation affecting millions of individuals.3 The Middle East is the most water-scarce region in the world.4 In 1955, three Arab countries suffered water scarcity; today, that number is eleven and scholars predict seven more nations joining the list by 2025.5 While population growth plays a huge role in the increased demand, the agricultural sector accounts for more than 70 percent of water use throughout the region. The introduction of pumpwells and massive irrigation schemes nearly doubled the amount of irrigated land between 1965 and 1997.6},
  author       = {Wessels, Joshka},
  issn         = {1538-6589},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {131--142},
  publisher    = {Seton Hall University},
  series       = {The Whitehead Journal of Diplomacy and International Relations},
  title        = {Water Crisis in The Middle East: An Opportunity for New Forms of Water Governance and Peace},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2009},
}