Advanced

Atomic Spectroscopy by Resonance Scattering

Svanberg, Sune LU (1979) In Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Mathematical and Physical Sciences 293(1402). p.215-222
Abstract
Resonance scattering techniques are very useful for high-resolution atomic spectroscopy. The applicability of these techniques has been much extended, particularly through the rapid development of tunable-laser technology. The use of a narrowband tunable laser, acting on a collimated atomic beam, gives a direct method enabling, for example, hyperfine structure and isotope shift studies. The intensity of lasers allows stepwise excitations to be performed, and with the two-photon absorption technique, Doppler-free measurements on thermal gases are also possible. By using pulsed lasers, time-resolved measurements yielding radiative life-times and structural information can be performed. The basic resonance scattering methods can be combined... (More)
Resonance scattering techniques are very useful for high-resolution atomic spectroscopy. The applicability of these techniques has been much extended, particularly through the rapid development of tunable-laser technology. The use of a narrowband tunable laser, acting on a collimated atomic beam, gives a direct method enabling, for example, hyperfine structure and isotope shift studies. The intensity of lasers allows stepwise excitations to be performed, and with the two-photon absorption technique, Doppler-free measurements on thermal gases are also possible. By using pulsed lasers, time-resolved measurements yielding radiative life-times and structural information can be performed. The basic resonance scattering methods can be combined with radiofrequency and coherence techniques to yield a resolution, limited only by the uncertainty relation. Optical double resonance and level-crossing techniques, not requiring a narrow-band light source, have been extensively used. Several examples of the application of resonance scattering methods are given. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Mathematical and Physical Sciences
volume
293
issue
1402
pages
215 - 222
publisher
Royal Society
ISSN
0080-4614
DOI
10.1098/rsta.1979.0091
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5d3d1e7a-adcb-44b7-afb0-e59aaaaef51d (old id 2259525)
date added to LUP
2012-02-09 18:25:53
date last changed
2016-10-05 09:01:54
@article{5d3d1e7a-adcb-44b7-afb0-e59aaaaef51d,
  abstract     = {Resonance scattering techniques are very useful for high-resolution atomic spectroscopy. The applicability of these techniques has been much extended, particularly through the rapid development of tunable-laser technology. The use of a narrowband tunable laser, acting on a collimated atomic beam, gives a direct method enabling, for example, hyperfine structure and isotope shift studies. The intensity of lasers allows stepwise excitations to be performed, and with the two-photon absorption technique, Doppler-free measurements on thermal gases are also possible. By using pulsed lasers, time-resolved measurements yielding radiative life-times and structural information can be performed. The basic resonance scattering methods can be combined with radiofrequency and coherence techniques to yield a resolution, limited only by the uncertainty relation. Optical double resonance and level-crossing techniques, not requiring a narrow-band light source, have been extensively used. Several examples of the application of resonance scattering methods are given.},
  author       = {Svanberg, Sune},
  issn         = {0080-4614},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1402},
  pages        = {215--222},
  publisher    = {Royal Society},
  series       = {Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Mathematical and Physical Sciences},
  title        = {Atomic Spectroscopy by Resonance Scattering},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsta.1979.0091},
  volume       = {293},
  year         = {1979},
}