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Long-term weight change and breast cancer risk: the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC)

Lahmann, PH; Schulz, M; Hoffmann, K; Boeing, H; Tjonneland, A; Olsen, A; Overvad, K; Key, TJ; Allen, NE and Khaw, KT, et al. (2005) In British Journal of Cancer 93(5). p.582-589
Abstract
We examined prospectively the association between weight change during adulthood and breast cancer risk, using data on 1358 incident cases that developed during 5.8 years of follow-up among 40 429 premenopausal and 57 923 postmenopausal women from six European countries, taking part in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition study. Multivariate Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios according to weight change ( kg), defined as the weight difference between age at enrolment and age 20 adjusted for other risk factors. Changes in weight were not associated with premenopausal breast cancer risk. In postmenopausal women, weight gain was positively associated with breast cancer risk only among... (More)
We examined prospectively the association between weight change during adulthood and breast cancer risk, using data on 1358 incident cases that developed during 5.8 years of follow-up among 40 429 premenopausal and 57 923 postmenopausal women from six European countries, taking part in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition study. Multivariate Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios according to weight change ( kg), defined as the weight difference between age at enrolment and age 20 adjusted for other risk factors. Changes in weight were not associated with premenopausal breast cancer risk. In postmenopausal women, weight gain was positively associated with breast cancer risk only among noncurrent hormone replacement therapy (HRT) users (P-trend <= 0.0002). Compared to women with a stable weight ( 72 kg), the relative risk for women who gained 15 - 20 kg was 1.50 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06 - 2.13). The pooled RR per weight gain increment of 5 kg was 1.08 ( 95% CI 1.04 - 1.12). Weight gain was not associated with breast cancer risk in current HRT users, although, overall, these women experienced a much higher risk of breast cancer compared with nonusers. Our findings suggest that large adult weight gain was a significant predictor of breast cancer in postmenopausal women not taking exogenous hormones. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
breast neoplasm, weight history, obesity, replacement therapy, hormone, weight gain, menopausal status
in
British Journal of Cancer
volume
93
issue
5
pages
582 - 589
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000231548900014
  • pmid:16136032
  • scopus:26944441707
ISSN
1532-1827
DOI
10.1038/sj.bjc.6602763
language
English
LU publication?
yes
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44f19996-9de2-4601-87ec-56dbdcac1dfa (old id 226409)
date added to LUP
2007-08-16 14:11:48
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2017-11-19 03:35:40
@article{44f19996-9de2-4601-87ec-56dbdcac1dfa,
  abstract     = {We examined prospectively the association between weight change during adulthood and breast cancer risk, using data on 1358 incident cases that developed during 5.8 years of follow-up among 40 429 premenopausal and 57 923 postmenopausal women from six European countries, taking part in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition study. Multivariate Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios according to weight change ( kg), defined as the weight difference between age at enrolment and age 20 adjusted for other risk factors. Changes in weight were not associated with premenopausal breast cancer risk. In postmenopausal women, weight gain was positively associated with breast cancer risk only among noncurrent hormone replacement therapy (HRT) users (P-trend &lt;= 0.0002). Compared to women with a stable weight ( 72 kg), the relative risk for women who gained 15 - 20 kg was 1.50 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06 - 2.13). The pooled RR per weight gain increment of 5 kg was 1.08 ( 95% CI 1.04 - 1.12). Weight gain was not associated with breast cancer risk in current HRT users, although, overall, these women experienced a much higher risk of breast cancer compared with nonusers. Our findings suggest that large adult weight gain was a significant predictor of breast cancer in postmenopausal women not taking exogenous hormones.},
  author       = {Lahmann, PH and Schulz, M and Hoffmann, K and Boeing, H and Tjonneland, A and Olsen, A and Overvad, K and Key, TJ and Allen, NE and Khaw, KT and Bingham, S and Berglund, Göran and Wirfält, Elisabet and Berrino, F and Krogh, V and Trichopoulou, A and Lagiou, P and Trichopoulos, D and Kaaks, R and Riboli, E},
  issn         = {1532-1827},
  keyword      = {breast neoplasm,weight history,obesity,replacement therapy,hormone,weight gain,menopausal status},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {582--589},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {British Journal of Cancer},
  title        = {Long-term weight change and breast cancer risk: the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6602763},
  volume       = {93},
  year         = {2005},
}