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Start-ups among university employees: The influence of legitimacy, human capital and social capital

Karlsson, Tomas LU and Wigren, Caroline LU (2012) In Journal of Technology Transfer 37(3). p.297-312
Abstract (Swedish)
Abstract in Undetermined

Using a sample of 7,260 university employees, we investigate how legitimacy, social and human capital influence the employees’ start-up propensity. We find that scientific legitimacy, as measured by the number of recently published peer reviewed scientific articles, and conference papers accepted had no significant effect. Scientific legitimacy measured as publications in non-peer review journals even had a negative effect. Popular legitimacy showed mixed results. Measured as number of articles in popular science publications showed positive correlations and other public media appearances had a non significant effect on start-up propensity. Individuals who are older and have higher level of human... (More)
Abstract in Undetermined

Using a sample of 7,260 university employees, we investigate how legitimacy, social and human capital influence the employees’ start-up propensity. We find that scientific legitimacy, as measured by the number of recently published peer reviewed scientific articles, and conference papers accepted had no significant effect. Scientific legitimacy measured as publications in non-peer review journals even had a negative effect. Popular legitimacy showed mixed results. Measured as number of articles in popular science publications showed positive correlations and other public media appearances had a non significant effect on start-up propensity. Individuals who are older and have higher level of human capital, measured as level of education are less likely to start firms. We also found that, people with more social capital, such as contact with external product development teams are more likely to start new firms. Taken together, the findings suggest that activities spanning the university-business divide increase the start-up propensity, while within university activities had no, or negative effects on the propensity. Consequently, universities interested in encouraging their employees to start firms should focus their attention on creating spanning activities rather than improving conditions for within university tenure. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Technology Transfer
volume
37
issue
3
pages
297 - 312
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000303480700003
  • scopus:84857641525
ISSN
0892-9912
DOI
10.1007/s10961-010-9175-6
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d658e33e-e133-4a79-89ec-406ac84d8d97 (old id 2278195)
date added to LUP
2012-01-09 15:52:34
date last changed
2017-07-09 03:21:58
@article{d658e33e-e133-4a79-89ec-406ac84d8d97,
  abstract     = {<b>Abstract in Undetermined</b><br/><br>
Using a sample of 7,260 university employees, we investigate how legitimacy, social and human capital influence the employees’ start-up propensity. We find that scientific legitimacy, as measured by the number of recently published peer reviewed scientific articles, and conference papers accepted had no significant effect. Scientific legitimacy measured as publications in non-peer review journals even had a negative effect. Popular legitimacy showed mixed results. Measured as number of articles in popular science publications showed positive correlations and other public media appearances had a non significant effect on start-up propensity. Individuals who are older and have higher level of human capital, measured as level of education are less likely to start firms. We also found that, people with more social capital, such as contact with external product development teams are more likely to start new firms. Taken together, the findings suggest that activities spanning the university-business divide increase the start-up propensity, while within university activities had no, or negative effects on the propensity. Consequently, universities interested in encouraging their employees to start firms should focus their attention on creating spanning activities rather than improving conditions for within university tenure.},
  author       = {Karlsson, Tomas and Wigren, Caroline},
  issn         = {0892-9912},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {297--312},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Journal of Technology Transfer},
  title        = {Start-ups among university employees: The influence of legitimacy, human capital and social capital},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10961-010-9175-6},
  volume       = {37},
  year         = {2012},
}