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Effects of prismatic glasses including optometric correction on head and neck kinematics, perceived exertion and comfort during dental work in the oral cavity - A randomised controlled intervention

Lindegard, A.; Gustafsson, M. and Hansson, Gert-Åke LU (2012) In Applied Ergonomics 43(1). p.246-253
Abstract
Aim: To quantify the effects of using prismatic glasses including optometric correction, on head and neck kinematics, perceived exertion and comfort, during work in the oral cavity. Methods: The study population consisted of forty-five participants. After a basic ergonomic education, baseline measurements of head and neck kinematics were made using inclinometers. Perceived exertion and comfort were rated by the participants. An intervention group (n = 25), selected at random from the participants, received prismatic glasses and optometric correction when needed and were compared with a control group (n = 20). Follow up assessments were made after the intervention. Results: At follow up there was a reduction in both the intervention group... (More)
Aim: To quantify the effects of using prismatic glasses including optometric correction, on head and neck kinematics, perceived exertion and comfort, during work in the oral cavity. Methods: The study population consisted of forty-five participants. After a basic ergonomic education, baseline measurements of head and neck kinematics were made using inclinometers. Perceived exertion and comfort were rated by the participants. An intervention group (n = 25), selected at random from the participants, received prismatic glasses and optometric correction when needed and were compared with a control group (n = 20). Follow up assessments were made after the intervention. Results: At follow up there was a reduction in both the intervention group (8.7 degrees) and in the control group (3.6 degrees) regarding head flexion. Neck flexion was reduced by 8.2 degrees in the intervention group and 3.3 degrees in the control group. The difference between the intervention and the control groups, i.e. the effect of the intervention, was statistically significant for both head (5.1 degrees; p = 0.009) and neck (4.9 degrees; p = 0.045) flexion. No effect of the intervention was seen regarding perceived exertion and comfort. Conclusion: The reduction in head and neck flexion achieved by the prismatic glasses is likely to reduce the risk of neck pain during dental work. The effect of the prismatic lenses could not be separated from the effect of the optometric correction. The possible effect of the ergonomic education was not evaluated. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Head, Neck, Inclinometry, Dental ergonomics
in
Applied Ergonomics
volume
43
issue
1
pages
246 - 253
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000295445700027
  • scopus:80052405820
ISSN
1872-9126
DOI
10.1016/j.apergo.2011.05.011
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1474ae9a-e3b0-484a-a4bd-25178daaf451 (old id 2279056)
date added to LUP
2012-01-11 14:21:22
date last changed
2017-07-09 04:03:43
@article{1474ae9a-e3b0-484a-a4bd-25178daaf451,
  abstract     = {Aim: To quantify the effects of using prismatic glasses including optometric correction, on head and neck kinematics, perceived exertion and comfort, during work in the oral cavity. Methods: The study population consisted of forty-five participants. After a basic ergonomic education, baseline measurements of head and neck kinematics were made using inclinometers. Perceived exertion and comfort were rated by the participants. An intervention group (n = 25), selected at random from the participants, received prismatic glasses and optometric correction when needed and were compared with a control group (n = 20). Follow up assessments were made after the intervention. Results: At follow up there was a reduction in both the intervention group (8.7 degrees) and in the control group (3.6 degrees) regarding head flexion. Neck flexion was reduced by 8.2 degrees in the intervention group and 3.3 degrees in the control group. The difference between the intervention and the control groups, i.e. the effect of the intervention, was statistically significant for both head (5.1 degrees; p = 0.009) and neck (4.9 degrees; p = 0.045) flexion. No effect of the intervention was seen regarding perceived exertion and comfort. Conclusion: The reduction in head and neck flexion achieved by the prismatic glasses is likely to reduce the risk of neck pain during dental work. The effect of the prismatic lenses could not be separated from the effect of the optometric correction. The possible effect of the ergonomic education was not evaluated. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Lindegard, A. and Gustafsson, M. and Hansson, Gert-Åke},
  issn         = {1872-9126},
  keyword      = {Head,Neck,Inclinometry,Dental ergonomics},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {246--253},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Applied Ergonomics},
  title        = {Effects of prismatic glasses including optometric correction on head and neck kinematics, perceived exertion and comfort during dental work in the oral cavity - A randomised controlled intervention},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apergo.2011.05.011},
  volume       = {43},
  year         = {2012},
}