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Growth and competitiveness of the New Zealand tree species Podocarpus cunninghamii is reduced by ex-agricultural AMF but enhanced by forest AMF

Williams, Alwyn LU ; Rigdway, Hayley J. and Norton, David A. (2011) In Soil Biology & Biochemistry 43(2). p.339-345
Abstract
The composition of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) communities found in agricultural systems has been found to be very different to that of forest. The implications of this, if any, for the restoration of indigenous forest on ex-agricultural land is poorly understood. This study investigated the effect that AMF communities isolated from ex-agricultural and forest soils have on the growth of an indigenous New Zealand tree species (Podocarpus cunninghamii). The forest AMF community was isolated from a remnant stand of P. cunninghamii forest and the ex-agricultural AMF from a retired grazing grassland. In addition, the study examined how the two AMF communities affected the competitiveness of P. cunninghamii when grown in competition with... (More)
The composition of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) communities found in agricultural systems has been found to be very different to that of forest. The implications of this, if any, for the restoration of indigenous forest on ex-agricultural land is poorly understood. This study investigated the effect that AMF communities isolated from ex-agricultural and forest soils have on the growth of an indigenous New Zealand tree species (Podocarpus cunninghamii). The forest AMF community was isolated from a remnant stand of P. cunninghamii forest and the ex-agricultural AMF from a retired grazing grassland. In addition, the study examined how the two AMF communities affected the competitiveness of P. cunninghamii when grown in competition with an invasive grass species (Agrostis capillaris), which is frequently dominant on ex-agricultural land in New Zealand. P. cunninghamii growth was significantly decreased by inoculation with ex-agricultural AMF compared to forest AMF. Furthermore, the forest AMF community was able to significantly increase P. cunninghamii root production when in competition with A. capillaris. The findings suggest that when attempting to restore indigenous forest on ex-agricultural land, inoculation of tree seedlings with appropriate forest AMF may improve their growth and survival. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Agriculture, Agrostis capillaris, arbuscular mycorrhiza, competition, forest restoration, mutualism, New Zealand, Podocarpus cunninghamii
in
Soil Biology & Biochemistry
volume
43
issue
2
pages
339 - 345
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:78650679177
ISSN
0038-0717
DOI
10.1016/j.soilbio.2010.10.021
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
f8fd9f32-c4d9-45da-85ec-4458b6d77be2 (old id 2302274)
date added to LUP
2012-02-08 13:15:22
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:13:10
@article{f8fd9f32-c4d9-45da-85ec-4458b6d77be2,
  abstract     = {The composition of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) communities found in agricultural systems has been found to be very different to that of forest. The implications of this, if any, for the restoration of indigenous forest on ex-agricultural land is poorly understood. This study investigated the effect that AMF communities isolated from ex-agricultural and forest soils have on the growth of an indigenous New Zealand tree species (Podocarpus cunninghamii). The forest AMF community was isolated from a remnant stand of P. cunninghamii forest and the ex-agricultural AMF from a retired grazing grassland. In addition, the study examined how the two AMF communities affected the competitiveness of P. cunninghamii when grown in competition with an invasive grass species (Agrostis capillaris), which is frequently dominant on ex-agricultural land in New Zealand. P. cunninghamii growth was significantly decreased by inoculation with ex-agricultural AMF compared to forest AMF. Furthermore, the forest AMF community was able to significantly increase P. cunninghamii root production when in competition with A. capillaris. The findings suggest that when attempting to restore indigenous forest on ex-agricultural land, inoculation of tree seedlings with appropriate forest AMF may improve their growth and survival.},
  author       = {Williams, Alwyn and Rigdway, Hayley J. and Norton, David A.},
  issn         = {0038-0717},
  keyword      = {Agriculture,Agrostis capillaris,arbuscular mycorrhiza,competition,forest restoration,mutualism,New Zealand,Podocarpus cunninghamii},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {339--345},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Soil Biology & Biochemistry},
  title        = {Growth and competitiveness of the New Zealand tree species Podocarpus cunninghamii is reduced by ex-agricultural AMF but enhanced by forest AMF},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2010.10.021},
  volume       = {43},
  year         = {2011},
}