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A system for automated tracking of motor components in neurophysiological research

Palmér, Tobias LU ; Tamté, Martin LU ; Enqvist, Olof LU ; Halje, Pär LU and Petersson, Per LU (2012) In Journal of Neuroscience Methods 205(2). p.334-344
Abstract
In the study of motor systems it is often necessary to track the movements of an experimental animal in great detail to allow for interpretation of recorded brain signals corresponding to different control signals. This task becomes increasingly difficult when analyzing complex compound movements in freely moving animals. One example of a complex motor behavior that can be studied in rodents is the skilled reaching test where animals are trained to use their forepaws to grasp small food objects, in many ways similar to human hand use. To fully exploit this model in neurophysiological research it is desirable to describe the kinematics at the level of movements around individual joints in 3D space since this permits analyses of how neuronal... (More)
In the study of motor systems it is often necessary to track the movements of an experimental animal in great detail to allow for interpretation of recorded brain signals corresponding to different control signals. This task becomes increasingly difficult when analyzing complex compound movements in freely moving animals. One example of a complex motor behavior that can be studied in rodents is the skilled reaching test where animals are trained to use their forepaws to grasp small food objects, in many ways similar to human hand use. To fully exploit this model in neurophysiological research it is desirable to describe the kinematics at the level of movements around individual joints in 3D space since this permits analyses of how neuronal control signals relate to complex movement patterns. To this end, we have developed an automated system that estimates the

paw pose using an anatomical paw model and recorded video images from six different image planes in rats chronically implanted with recording electrodes in neuronal circuits involved in selection and execution of forelimb movements. The kinematic description provided by the system allowed for a decomposition of reaching movements into a subset of motor components. Interestingly, firing rates of individual neurons were found to be modulated in relation to the actuation of these motor components suggesting that sets of motor primitives may constitute building blocks for the encoding of movement commands in motor circuits. The designed system will, thus, enable a more detailed analytical approach in neurophysiological studies of motor systems. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Corticostriatal, Hand pose estimation, Reaching, 3D-model, Motor control
in
Journal of Neuroscience Methods
volume
205
issue
2
pages
334 - 344
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:22306061
  • wos:000302435400013
  • scopus:84857209611
ISSN
1872-678X
DOI
10.1016/j.jneumeth.2012.01.008
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f307b4d2-e3e3-43cb-a250-7b3c3ac00982 (old id 2303875)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22306061?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-02-09 15:38:50
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:03:54
@article{f307b4d2-e3e3-43cb-a250-7b3c3ac00982,
  abstract     = {In the study of motor systems it is often necessary to track the movements of an experimental animal in great detail to allow for interpretation of recorded brain signals corresponding to different control signals. This task becomes increasingly difficult when analyzing complex compound movements in freely moving animals. One example of a complex motor behavior that can be studied in rodents is the skilled reaching test where animals are trained to use their forepaws to grasp small food objects, in many ways similar to human hand use. To fully exploit this model in neurophysiological research it is desirable to describe the kinematics at the level of movements around individual joints in 3D space since this permits analyses of how neuronal control signals relate to complex movement patterns. To this end, we have developed an automated system that estimates the<br/><br>
paw pose using an anatomical paw model and recorded video images from six different image planes in rats chronically implanted with recording electrodes in neuronal circuits involved in selection and execution of forelimb movements. The kinematic description provided by the system allowed for a decomposition of reaching movements into a subset of motor components. Interestingly, firing rates of individual neurons were found to be modulated in relation to the actuation of these motor components suggesting that sets of motor primitives may constitute building blocks for the encoding of movement commands in motor circuits. The designed system will, thus, enable a more detailed analytical approach in neurophysiological studies of motor systems.},
  author       = {Palmér, Tobias and Tamté, Martin and Enqvist, Olof and Halje, Pär and Petersson, Per},
  issn         = {1872-678X},
  keyword      = {Corticostriatal,Hand pose estimation,Reaching,3D-model,Motor control},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {334--344},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Neuroscience Methods},
  title        = {A system for automated tracking of motor components in neurophysiological research},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jneumeth.2012.01.008},
  volume       = {205},
  year         = {2012},
}