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Long-term follow-up in primary Sjögren's syndrome reveals differences in clinical presentation between female and male patients

Ramírez Sepúlveda, Jorge I; Kvarnström, Marika; Eriksson, Per; Mandl, Thomas LU ; Norheim, Katrine Brække; Johnsen, Svein Joar Auglaend; Hammenfors, Daniel; Jonsson, Malin V; Skarstein, Kathrine and Brun, Johan G, et al. (2017) In Biology of Sex Differences 8(1). p.25-25
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Despite men being less prone to develop autoimmune diseases, male sex has been associated with a more severe disease course in several systemic autoimmune diseases. In the present study, we aimed to investigate differences in the clinical presentation of primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) between the sexes and establish whether male sex is associated with a more severe form of long-term pSS.

METHODS: Our study population included 967 patients with pSS (899 females and 68 males) from Scandinavian clinical centers. The mean follow-up time (years) was 8.8 ± 7.6 for women and 8.5 ± 6.2 for men (ns). Clinical data including serological and hematological parameters and glandular and extraglandular manifestations were compared... (More)

BACKGROUND: Despite men being less prone to develop autoimmune diseases, male sex has been associated with a more severe disease course in several systemic autoimmune diseases. In the present study, we aimed to investigate differences in the clinical presentation of primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) between the sexes and establish whether male sex is associated with a more severe form of long-term pSS.

METHODS: Our study population included 967 patients with pSS (899 females and 68 males) from Scandinavian clinical centers. The mean follow-up time (years) was 8.8 ± 7.6 for women and 8.5 ± 6.2 for men (ns). Clinical data including serological and hematological parameters and glandular and extraglandular manifestations were compared between men and women.

RESULTS: Male patient serology was characterized by more frequent positivity for anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB (p = 0.02), and ANA (p = 0.02). Further, men with pSS were more frequently diagnosed with interstitial lung disease (p = 0.008), lymphadenopathy (p = 0.04) and lymphoma (p = 0.007). Conversely, concomitant hypothyroidism was more common among female patients (p = 0.009).

CONCLUSIONS: We observe enhanced serological responses and higher frequencies of lymphoma-related extraglandular manifestations in men with pSS. Notably, lymphoma itself was also significantly more common in men. These observations may reflect an aggravated immune activation and a more severe pathophysiological state in male patients with pSS and indicate a personalized managing of the disease due to the influence of the sex of patients with pSS.

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keywords
Journal Article
in
Biology of Sex Differences
volume
8
issue
1
pages
25 - 25
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • scopus:85026910062
ISSN
2042-6410
DOI
10.1186/s13293-017-0146-6
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
230f5ad0-d331-422d-99e0-539cb244c6cf
date added to LUP
2017-11-08 16:23:59
date last changed
2018-01-07 12:25:27
@article{230f5ad0-d331-422d-99e0-539cb244c6cf,
  abstract     = {<p>BACKGROUND: Despite men being less prone to develop autoimmune diseases, male sex has been associated with a more severe disease course in several systemic autoimmune diseases. In the present study, we aimed to investigate differences in the clinical presentation of primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) between the sexes and establish whether male sex is associated with a more severe form of long-term pSS.</p><p>METHODS: Our study population included 967 patients with pSS (899 females and 68 males) from Scandinavian clinical centers. The mean follow-up time (years) was 8.8 ± 7.6 for women and 8.5 ± 6.2 for men (ns). Clinical data including serological and hematological parameters and glandular and extraglandular manifestations were compared between men and women.</p><p>RESULTS: Male patient serology was characterized by more frequent positivity for anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB (p = 0.02), and ANA (p = 0.02). Further, men with pSS were more frequently diagnosed with interstitial lung disease (p = 0.008), lymphadenopathy (p = 0.04) and lymphoma (p = 0.007). Conversely, concomitant hypothyroidism was more common among female patients (p = 0.009).</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: We observe enhanced serological responses and higher frequencies of lymphoma-related extraglandular manifestations in men with pSS. Notably, lymphoma itself was also significantly more common in men. These observations may reflect an aggravated immune activation and a more severe pathophysiological state in male patients with pSS and indicate a personalized managing of the disease due to the influence of the sex of patients with pSS.</p>},
  author       = {Ramírez Sepúlveda, Jorge I and Kvarnström, Marika and Eriksson, Per and Mandl, Thomas and Norheim, Katrine Brække and Johnsen, Svein Joar Auglaend and Hammenfors, Daniel and Jonsson, Malin V and Skarstein, Kathrine and Brun, Johan G and Rönnblom, Lars and Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena and Magnusson Bucher, Sara and Baecklund, Eva and Theander, Elke and Omdal, Roald and Jonsson, Roland and Nordmark, Gunnel and Wahren-Herlenius, Marie and , },
  issn         = {2042-6410},
  keyword      = {Journal Article},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {25--25},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {Biology of Sex Differences},
  title        = {Long-term follow-up in primary Sjögren's syndrome reveals differences in clinical presentation between female and male patients},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13293-017-0146-6},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2017},
}