Advanced

Colonization with Staphylococcus aureus in Swedish nursing homes: A cross-sectional study

Olofsson, Magnus; Lindgren, Per-Eric; Ostgren, Carl Johan; Midlöv, Patrik LU and Molstad, Sigvard (2012) In Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases 44(1). p.3-8
Abstract
Background: Screening for bacterial colonization among risk populations could provide better estimates of the volume of the bacteria-related disease reservoir and the level of antimicrobial resistance, than do conventional laboratory reports. Methods: Two hundred and one participants at 10 Swedish nursing homes were screened for colonization with Staphylococcus aureus between January and October 2009. Of the 201 participants, 61 (30%) were male. The median age was 86 y. All participants were systematically sampled from the nasal mucosa, the pharyngeal mucosa, the groin, and active skin lesions, if any. Results: Ninety-nine of 199 participants (50%) were colonized with S. aureus. The colonization rate was 34% for the nose, 35% for throat,... (More)
Background: Screening for bacterial colonization among risk populations could provide better estimates of the volume of the bacteria-related disease reservoir and the level of antimicrobial resistance, than do conventional laboratory reports. Methods: Two hundred and one participants at 10 Swedish nursing homes were screened for colonization with Staphylococcus aureus between January and October 2009. Of the 201 participants, 61 (30%) were male. The median age was 86 y. All participants were systematically sampled from the nasal mucosa, the pharyngeal mucosa, the groin, and active skin lesions, if any. Results: Ninety-nine of 199 participants (50%) were colonized with S. aureus. The colonization rate was 34% for the nose, 35% for throat, 10% for groin, and 54% for active skin lesions. An antibiotic-resistant S. aureus isolate was identified in 8.5% of all participants regardless of colonization status. A total of 24 resistant isolates were detected, and 21 of these were resistant to fluoroquinolones. There was no case of colonization with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Conclusions: The presence of resistant isolates was generally low, and the greater part of the resistance was fluoroquinolone-related. To achieve reasonable precision, screening programmes of this kind must include samples from both the nose and throat, and, although low, the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in Swedish nursing homes still calls for reflection on how to use the fluoroquinolones wisely. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, colonization, nursing homes, drug resistance (bacterial)
in
Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases
volume
44
issue
1
pages
3 - 8
publisher
Informa Healthcare
external identifiers
  • wos:000298297200002
  • scopus:84555194688
ISSN
1651-1980
DOI
10.3109/00365548.2011.598875
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5a461fcf-9dc6-43bc-b4c7-51fe7254961c (old id 2333846)
date added to LUP
2012-02-01 07:40:53
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:41:00
@article{5a461fcf-9dc6-43bc-b4c7-51fe7254961c,
  abstract     = {Background: Screening for bacterial colonization among risk populations could provide better estimates of the volume of the bacteria-related disease reservoir and the level of antimicrobial resistance, than do conventional laboratory reports. Methods: Two hundred and one participants at 10 Swedish nursing homes were screened for colonization with Staphylococcus aureus between January and October 2009. Of the 201 participants, 61 (30%) were male. The median age was 86 y. All participants were systematically sampled from the nasal mucosa, the pharyngeal mucosa, the groin, and active skin lesions, if any. Results: Ninety-nine of 199 participants (50%) were colonized with S. aureus. The colonization rate was 34% for the nose, 35% for throat, 10% for groin, and 54% for active skin lesions. An antibiotic-resistant S. aureus isolate was identified in 8.5% of all participants regardless of colonization status. A total of 24 resistant isolates were detected, and 21 of these were resistant to fluoroquinolones. There was no case of colonization with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Conclusions: The presence of resistant isolates was generally low, and the greater part of the resistance was fluoroquinolone-related. To achieve reasonable precision, screening programmes of this kind must include samples from both the nose and throat, and, although low, the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in Swedish nursing homes still calls for reflection on how to use the fluoroquinolones wisely.},
  author       = {Olofsson, Magnus and Lindgren, Per-Eric and Ostgren, Carl Johan and Midlöv, Patrik and Molstad, Sigvard},
  issn         = {1651-1980},
  keyword      = {Staphylococcus aureus,methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus,colonization,nursing homes,drug resistance (bacterial)},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {3--8},
  publisher    = {Informa Healthcare},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases},
  title        = {Colonization with Staphylococcus aureus in Swedish nursing homes: A cross-sectional study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00365548.2011.598875},
  volume       = {44},
  year         = {2012},
}