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Monoamine theories of depression: historical impact on biomedical research

Mulinari, Shai LU (2012) In Journal of the History of the Neurosciences 21(4). p.366-392
Abstract
Monoamine theories associate depression with reduced brain monoamine levels. These theories achieved broad popularity in the mid-1960s. The present article reviews the historical development of monoamine theories and their subsequent impact on biomedical research. Alleged divisions between West European and U.S. researchers over competing versions of the theories are investigated using bibliometrics. Subsequently, the application of monoamine theories in the NIMH Collaborative Program on the Psychobiology of Depression is covered. The paper argues that the impact of monoamine theories is best explained by the ability of researchers, governmental agencies and pharmaceutical companies to invoke theories that advance various projects and... (More)
Monoamine theories associate depression with reduced brain monoamine levels. These theories achieved broad popularity in the mid-1960s. The present article reviews the historical development of monoamine theories and their subsequent impact on biomedical research. Alleged divisions between West European and U.S. researchers over competing versions of the theories are investigated using bibliometrics. Subsequently, the application of monoamine theories in the NIMH Collaborative Program on the Psychobiology of Depression is covered. The paper argues that the impact of monoamine theories is best explained by the ability of researchers, governmental agencies and pharmaceutical companies to invoke theories that advance various projects and agendas. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
depression, biological psychiatry, history, monoamine hypothesis, monoamine theory, Psychobiology of Depression Program, NIMH, bibliometrics
in
Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
volume
21
issue
4
pages
366 - 392
publisher
Psychology Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000308444100002
  • scopus:84866302252
ISSN
0964-704X
DOI
10.1080/0964704X.2011.623917
project
After the success with the new generation antidepressants: Experiences, practices, discourses and changes in the self.
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a7d4154b-ebfc-4920-8eb6-87b10bcb48cf (old id 2341614)
alternative location
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0964704X.2011.623917
date added to LUP
2012-02-28 16:03:51
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:11:08
@article{a7d4154b-ebfc-4920-8eb6-87b10bcb48cf,
  abstract     = {Monoamine theories associate depression with reduced brain monoamine levels. These theories achieved broad popularity in the mid-1960s. The present article reviews the historical development of monoamine theories and their subsequent impact on biomedical research. Alleged divisions between West European and U.S. researchers over competing versions of the theories are investigated using bibliometrics. Subsequently, the application of monoamine theories in the NIMH Collaborative Program on the Psychobiology of Depression is covered. The paper argues that the impact of monoamine theories is best explained by the ability of researchers, governmental agencies and pharmaceutical companies to invoke theories that advance various projects and agendas.},
  author       = {Mulinari, Shai},
  issn         = {0964-704X},
  keyword      = {depression,biological psychiatry,history,monoamine hypothesis,monoamine theory,Psychobiology of Depression Program,NIMH,bibliometrics},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {366--392},
  publisher    = {Psychology Press},
  series       = {Journal of the History of the Neurosciences},
  title        = {Monoamine theories of depression: historical impact on biomedical research},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0964704X.2011.623917},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2012},
}