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Use Of 13 Disease Registries In 5 Countries Demonstrates The Potential To Use Outcome Data To Improve Health Care's Value

Larsson, Stefan; Lawyer, Peter; Garellick, Goran; Lindahl, Bertil and Lundström, Mats LU (2012) In Health Affairs 31(1). p.220-227
Abstract
As health care systems worldwide struggle with rising costs, a consensus is emerging to refocus reform efforts on value, as determined by the evaluation of patient outcomes relative to costs. One method of using outcome data to improve health care value is the disease registry. An international study of thirteen registries in five countries (Australia, Denmark, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States) suggests that by making outcome data transparent to both practitioners and the public, well-managed registries enable medical professionals to engage in continuous learning and to identify and share best clinical practices. The apparent result: improved health outcomes, often at lower cost. For example, we calculate that if the... (More)
As health care systems worldwide struggle with rising costs, a consensus is emerging to refocus reform efforts on value, as determined by the evaluation of patient outcomes relative to costs. One method of using outcome data to improve health care value is the disease registry. An international study of thirteen registries in five countries (Australia, Denmark, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States) suggests that by making outcome data transparent to both practitioners and the public, well-managed registries enable medical professionals to engage in continuous learning and to identify and share best clinical practices. The apparent result: improved health outcomes, often at lower cost. For example, we calculate that if the United States had a registry for hip replacement surgery comparable to one in Sweden that enabled reductions in the rates at which these surgeries are performed a second time to replace or repair hip prostheses, the United States would avoid $2 billion of an expected $24 billion in total costs for these surgeries in 2015. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Health Affairs
volume
31
issue
1
pages
220 - 227
publisher
Project HOPE
external identifiers
  • wos:000299309000027
  • scopus:84855705870
ISSN
0278-2715
DOI
10.1377/hlthaff.2011.0762
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1b5a4840-6945-4f0b-b433-93d49037a95a (old id 2355069)
date added to LUP
2012-03-01 11:19:56
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:38:19
@article{1b5a4840-6945-4f0b-b433-93d49037a95a,
  abstract     = {As health care systems worldwide struggle with rising costs, a consensus is emerging to refocus reform efforts on value, as determined by the evaluation of patient outcomes relative to costs. One method of using outcome data to improve health care value is the disease registry. An international study of thirteen registries in five countries (Australia, Denmark, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States) suggests that by making outcome data transparent to both practitioners and the public, well-managed registries enable medical professionals to engage in continuous learning and to identify and share best clinical practices. The apparent result: improved health outcomes, often at lower cost. For example, we calculate that if the United States had a registry for hip replacement surgery comparable to one in Sweden that enabled reductions in the rates at which these surgeries are performed a second time to replace or repair hip prostheses, the United States would avoid $2 billion of an expected $24 billion in total costs for these surgeries in 2015.},
  author       = {Larsson, Stefan and Lawyer, Peter and Garellick, Goran and Lindahl, Bertil and Lundström, Mats},
  issn         = {0278-2715},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {220--227},
  publisher    = {Project HOPE},
  series       = {Health Affairs},
  title        = {Use Of 13 Disease Registries In 5 Countries Demonstrates The Potential To Use Outcome Data To Improve Health Care's Value},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1377/hlthaff.2011.0762},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2012},
}