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Hearing difficulties, uptake, and outcomes of hearing aids in people 85 years of age

Oberg, M.; Marcusson, J.; Nägga, Katarina LU and Wressle, E. (2012) In International Journal of Audiology 51(2). p.108-115
Abstract
Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate self-reported hearing difficulties, uptake, and hearing-aid outcomes and their relationships to demographic, cognitive, psychosocial, and health variables in 85 year olds. Design and study sample: Three hundred and forty-six elderly adults participated in a survey that included questionnaires and home visits. Fifty-five percent of participants admitted to having hearing difficulties, and 59% of these owned hearing aids. The participants' most frequently cited reason for not acquiring hearing aids was that they did not think their hearing problem was perceived as severe enough. Participants with hearing difficulties who did not own hearing aids showed worse general and mental health. Many... (More)
Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate self-reported hearing difficulties, uptake, and hearing-aid outcomes and their relationships to demographic, cognitive, psychosocial, and health variables in 85 year olds. Design and study sample: Three hundred and forty-six elderly adults participated in a survey that included questionnaires and home visits. Fifty-five percent of participants admitted to having hearing difficulties, and 59% of these owned hearing aids. The participants' most frequently cited reason for not acquiring hearing aids was that they did not think their hearing problem was perceived as severe enough. Participants with hearing difficulties who did not own hearing aids showed worse general and mental health. Many of the elderly participants were successful in their rehabilitation, and their hearing-aid outcomes were similar to those of a younger group, with the exception of a greater proportion of non-users among the elderly. Conclusion: Many older people with self-reported hearing difficulties do not acquire hearing aids, despite this study's findings that older people are likely to have success with hearing rehabilitation. It is important to make greater efforts to try to increase elderly adults' awareness of hearing loss and the benefits of hearing rehabilitation. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Self-reported hearing difficulties, hearing aids, elderly, general, health
in
International Journal of Audiology
volume
51
issue
2
pages
108 - 115
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000299291800006
  • scopus:84856050537
ISSN
1708-8186
DOI
10.3109/14992027.2011.622301
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d5b97e70-f38e-4867-8830-9d7ac8110a9a (old id 2355168)
date added to LUP
2012-03-01 11:26:30
date last changed
2017-10-01 03:24:51
@article{d5b97e70-f38e-4867-8830-9d7ac8110a9a,
  abstract     = {Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate self-reported hearing difficulties, uptake, and hearing-aid outcomes and their relationships to demographic, cognitive, psychosocial, and health variables in 85 year olds. Design and study sample: Three hundred and forty-six elderly adults participated in a survey that included questionnaires and home visits. Fifty-five percent of participants admitted to having hearing difficulties, and 59% of these owned hearing aids. The participants' most frequently cited reason for not acquiring hearing aids was that they did not think their hearing problem was perceived as severe enough. Participants with hearing difficulties who did not own hearing aids showed worse general and mental health. Many of the elderly participants were successful in their rehabilitation, and their hearing-aid outcomes were similar to those of a younger group, with the exception of a greater proportion of non-users among the elderly. Conclusion: Many older people with self-reported hearing difficulties do not acquire hearing aids, despite this study's findings that older people are likely to have success with hearing rehabilitation. It is important to make greater efforts to try to increase elderly adults' awareness of hearing loss and the benefits of hearing rehabilitation.},
  author       = {Oberg, M. and Marcusson, J. and Nägga, Katarina and Wressle, E.},
  issn         = {1708-8186},
  keyword      = {Self-reported hearing difficulties,hearing aids,elderly,general,health},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {108--115},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {International Journal of Audiology},
  title        = {Hearing difficulties, uptake, and outcomes of hearing aids in people 85 years of age},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/14992027.2011.622301},
  volume       = {51},
  year         = {2012},
}