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Association of lower muscle strength with self-reported knee instability in osteoarthritis of the knee: Results from the Amsterdam Osteoarthritis Cohort

Knoop, Jesper; van der Leeden, Marike; van der Esch, Martin; Thorstensson, Carina LU ; Gerritsen, Martijn; Voorneman, Ramon E.; Lems, Willem F.; Roorda, Leo D.; Dekker, Joost and Steultjens, Martijn P. M. (2012) In Arthritis Care and Research1988-01-01+01:002000-01-01+01:00 64(1). p.38-45
Abstract
Objective To determine whether muscle strength, proprioceptive accuracy, and laxity are associated with self-reported knee instability in a large cohort of knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients, and to investigate whether muscle strength may compensate for impairment in proprioceptive accuracy or laxity, in order to maintain knee stability. Methods. Data from 283 knee OA patients from the Amsterdam Osteoarthritis cohort were used. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association between muscle strength, proprioceptive accuracy (motion sense), frontal plane varus-valgus laxity, and self-reported knee instability. Additionally, effect modification between muscle strength and proprioceptive... (More)
Objective To determine whether muscle strength, proprioceptive accuracy, and laxity are associated with self-reported knee instability in a large cohort of knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients, and to investigate whether muscle strength may compensate for impairment in proprioceptive accuracy or laxity, in order to maintain knee stability. Methods. Data from 283 knee OA patients from the Amsterdam Osteoarthritis cohort were used. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association between muscle strength, proprioceptive accuracy (motion sense), frontal plane varus-valgus laxity, and self-reported knee instability. Additionally, effect modification between muscle strength and proprioceptive accuracy and between muscle strength and laxity was determined. Results. Self-reported knee instability was present in 67% of the knee OA patients and mainly occurred during walking. Lower muscle strength was significantly associated with the presence of self-reported knee instability, even after adjusting for relevant confounding. Impaired proprioceptive accuracy and high laxity were not associated with self-reported knee instability. No effect modification between muscle strength and proprioceptive accuracy or laxity was found. Conclusion. Lower muscle strength is strongly associated with self-reported knee instability in knee OA patients, while impairments in proprioceptive accuracy and laxity are not. A compensatory role of muscle strength for impaired proprioceptive accuracy or high laxity, in order to stabilize the knee, could not be demonstrated. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Arthritis Care and Research1988-01-01+01:002000-01-01+01:00
volume
64
issue
1
pages
38 - 45
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000298536700007
  • scopus:84856882308
ISSN
2151-4658
DOI
10.1002/acr.20597
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4f65d257-41d4-4902-b35f-e5adb6663e33 (old id 2362517)
date added to LUP
2012-03-01 11:34:03
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:20:33
@article{4f65d257-41d4-4902-b35f-e5adb6663e33,
  abstract     = {Objective To determine whether muscle strength, proprioceptive accuracy, and laxity are associated with self-reported knee instability in a large cohort of knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients, and to investigate whether muscle strength may compensate for impairment in proprioceptive accuracy or laxity, in order to maintain knee stability. Methods. Data from 283 knee OA patients from the Amsterdam Osteoarthritis cohort were used. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association between muscle strength, proprioceptive accuracy (motion sense), frontal plane varus-valgus laxity, and self-reported knee instability. Additionally, effect modification between muscle strength and proprioceptive accuracy and between muscle strength and laxity was determined. Results. Self-reported knee instability was present in 67% of the knee OA patients and mainly occurred during walking. Lower muscle strength was significantly associated with the presence of self-reported knee instability, even after adjusting for relevant confounding. Impaired proprioceptive accuracy and high laxity were not associated with self-reported knee instability. No effect modification between muscle strength and proprioceptive accuracy or laxity was found. Conclusion. Lower muscle strength is strongly associated with self-reported knee instability in knee OA patients, while impairments in proprioceptive accuracy and laxity are not. A compensatory role of muscle strength for impaired proprioceptive accuracy or high laxity, in order to stabilize the knee, could not be demonstrated.},
  author       = {Knoop, Jesper and van der Leeden, Marike and van der Esch, Martin and Thorstensson, Carina and Gerritsen, Martijn and Voorneman, Ramon E. and Lems, Willem F. and Roorda, Leo D. and Dekker, Joost and Steultjens, Martijn P. M.},
  issn         = {2151-4658},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {38--45},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Arthritis Care and Research1988-01-01+01:002000-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {Association of lower muscle strength with self-reported knee instability in osteoarthritis of the knee: Results from the Amsterdam Osteoarthritis Cohort},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acr.20597},
  volume       = {64},
  year         = {2012},
}