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Survival in a large elderly population of patients with dementia and other forms of psychogeriatric diseases.

Nilsson, Karin LU ; Gustafson, Lars LU and Hultberg, Björn LU (2011) In Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders 32(5). p.342-350
Abstract
Background: Dementia and other psychogeriatric diseases in elderly patients bring an increased risk of death. Better knowledge of prognosis in elderly patients affected by dementia or mental illness should be of great importance in order to improve care plans and assist in medical decisions. Methods: We have investigated the survival time in 2,112 patients with dementia and other forms of psychogeriatric diseases, enrolled during 1990 to 2005 and followed up until 2009, and the influence of diagnoses, plasma homocysteine level, presence of vascular disease and renal impairment. Results: The survival time after diagnosis in most diagnostic groups is about a third compared to an average population of similar age and sex. Age was the main... (More)
Background: Dementia and other psychogeriatric diseases in elderly patients bring an increased risk of death. Better knowledge of prognosis in elderly patients affected by dementia or mental illness should be of great importance in order to improve care plans and assist in medical decisions. Methods: We have investigated the survival time in 2,112 patients with dementia and other forms of psychogeriatric diseases, enrolled during 1990 to 2005 and followed up until 2009, and the influence of diagnoses, plasma homocysteine level, presence of vascular disease and renal impairment. Results: The survival time after diagnosis in most diagnostic groups is about a third compared to an average population of similar age and sex. Age was the main predictor of survival time in all patients. Conclusions: All diagnoses, except in patients with subjective cognitive impairments, showed an increased mortality. These estimates can be used for prognosis and planning for patients, carers, service providers and policy makers. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
volume
32
issue
5
pages
342 - 350
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • wos:000300091000006
  • pmid:22311259
  • scopus:84856563456
ISSN
1420-8008
DOI
10.1159/000335728
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4bb3c477-e227-4b7a-aa50-82ac5e1dad7d (old id 2367214)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22311259?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-03-02 09:36:43
date last changed
2017-01-08 05:27:54
@article{4bb3c477-e227-4b7a-aa50-82ac5e1dad7d,
  abstract     = {Background: Dementia and other psychogeriatric diseases in elderly patients bring an increased risk of death. Better knowledge of prognosis in elderly patients affected by dementia or mental illness should be of great importance in order to improve care plans and assist in medical decisions. Methods: We have investigated the survival time in 2,112 patients with dementia and other forms of psychogeriatric diseases, enrolled during 1990 to 2005 and followed up until 2009, and the influence of diagnoses, plasma homocysteine level, presence of vascular disease and renal impairment. Results: The survival time after diagnosis in most diagnostic groups is about a third compared to an average population of similar age and sex. Age was the main predictor of survival time in all patients. Conclusions: All diagnoses, except in patients with subjective cognitive impairments, showed an increased mortality. These estimates can be used for prognosis and planning for patients, carers, service providers and policy makers.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Karin and Gustafson, Lars and Hultberg, Björn},
  issn         = {1420-8008},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {342--350},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders},
  title        = {Survival in a large elderly population of patients with dementia and other forms of psychogeriatric diseases.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000335728},
  volume       = {32},
  year         = {2011},
}