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Exhaled Breath Temperature Increases after Exercise in Asthmatics and Controls.

Henning, Martin; Nilsson, David LU ; Bjermer, Leif LU and Tufvesson, Ellen LU (2012) In Respiration 84(4). p.283-290
Abstract
Background: Exhaled breath temperature (EBT) has been suggested as a marker of airway inflammation in asthma. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate EBT in asthmatic subjects compared to healthy controls after an exercise challenge test, and in subjects with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction compared to subjects without, and to compare with body temperatures. Methods: A total of 21 healthy controls and 20 asthmatics were included. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)), EBT and oral, axillary and auricular temperatures were measured before and after an exercise challenge test. Results: FEV(1) % predicted (%p) was significantly lower in asthmatic subjects compared to healthy controls at all time points after... (More)
Background: Exhaled breath temperature (EBT) has been suggested as a marker of airway inflammation in asthma. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate EBT in asthmatic subjects compared to healthy controls after an exercise challenge test, and in subjects with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction compared to subjects without, and to compare with body temperatures. Methods: A total of 21 healthy controls and 20 asthmatics were included. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)), EBT and oral, axillary and auricular temperatures were measured before and after an exercise challenge test. Results: FEV(1) % predicted (%p) was significantly lower in asthmatic subjects compared to healthy controls at all time points after exercise. The largest drop in FEV(1)%p correlated with EBT after 5 min. EBT increased markedly 5 min after exercise and remained high for at least 60 min. In asthmatics whose FEV(1) dropped by >10%, EBT was higher after 60 min compared to the remaining asthmatics. EBT correlated with oral temperature at all time points after exercise, with axillary temperature only at 15, 30 and 60 min, and not at all with auricular temperature. Conclusions: EBT is increased after exercise, and elevated EBT correlated with a drop in FEV(1)%p. The immediate increase in EBT did not differ between asthmatics and controls but remained elevated in the asthmatics whose FEV(1) dropped by >10%, indicating a different vascular response. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Exercise, Asthma, Exhaled breath, Temperature
in
Respiration
volume
84
issue
4
pages
283 - 290
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • wos:000309519700003
  • pmid:22301670
  • scopus:84867083747
ISSN
1423-0356
DOI
10.1159/000335252
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3eb83232-3fee-47f9-8071-f19c86e51755 (old id 2367395)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22301670?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-03-02 08:36:06
date last changed
2017-10-01 04:24:11
@article{3eb83232-3fee-47f9-8071-f19c86e51755,
  abstract     = {Background: Exhaled breath temperature (EBT) has been suggested as a marker of airway inflammation in asthma. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate EBT in asthmatic subjects compared to healthy controls after an exercise challenge test, and in subjects with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction compared to subjects without, and to compare with body temperatures. Methods: A total of 21 healthy controls and 20 asthmatics were included. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)), EBT and oral, axillary and auricular temperatures were measured before and after an exercise challenge test. Results: FEV(1) % predicted (%p) was significantly lower in asthmatic subjects compared to healthy controls at all time points after exercise. The largest drop in FEV(1)%p correlated with EBT after 5 min. EBT increased markedly 5 min after exercise and remained high for at least 60 min. In asthmatics whose FEV(1) dropped by >10%, EBT was higher after 60 min compared to the remaining asthmatics. EBT correlated with oral temperature at all time points after exercise, with axillary temperature only at 15, 30 and 60 min, and not at all with auricular temperature. Conclusions: EBT is increased after exercise, and elevated EBT correlated with a drop in FEV(1)%p. The immediate increase in EBT did not differ between asthmatics and controls but remained elevated in the asthmatics whose FEV(1) dropped by >10%, indicating a different vascular response.},
  author       = {Henning, Martin and Nilsson, David and Bjermer, Leif and Tufvesson, Ellen},
  issn         = {1423-0356},
  keyword      = {Exercise,Asthma,Exhaled breath,Temperature},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {283--290},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Respiration},
  title        = {Exhaled Breath Temperature Increases after Exercise in Asthmatics and Controls.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000335252},
  volume       = {84},
  year         = {2012},
}