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No specific effect of whole-body vibration training in chronic stroke: a double-blind randomized controlled study.

Brogårdh, Christina LU ; Flansbjer, Ulla-Britt LU and Lexell, Jan LU (2012) In Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 93(2). p.253-258
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) training in individuals after stroke.



DESIGN: A double-blind randomized controlled study with assessments pre- and posttraining.



SETTING: A university hospital rehabilitation department.



PARTICIPANTS: Participants (N=31; mean age ± SD, 62±7y; 6-101mo poststroke) were randomized to an intervention group or a control group.



INTERVENTIONS: Supervised WBV training (2 sessions/wk for 6wk; 12 repetitions of 40-60s WBV per session). The intervention group trained on a vibrating platform with a conventional amplitude (3.75mm) and the control group on a "placebo" vibrating platform (0.2mm amplitude); the... (More)
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) training in individuals after stroke.



DESIGN: A double-blind randomized controlled study with assessments pre- and posttraining.



SETTING: A university hospital rehabilitation department.



PARTICIPANTS: Participants (N=31; mean age ± SD, 62±7y; 6-101mo poststroke) were randomized to an intervention group or a control group.



INTERVENTIONS: Supervised WBV training (2 sessions/wk for 6wk; 12 repetitions of 40-60s WBV per session). The intervention group trained on a vibrating platform with a conventional amplitude (3.75mm) and the control group on a "placebo" vibrating platform (0.2mm amplitude); the frequency was 25Hz on both platforms. All participants and examiners were blinded to the amplitudes of the 2 platforms.



MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome measures were isokinetic and isometric knee muscle strength (dynamometer). Secondary outcome measures were balance (Berg Balance Scale), muscle tone (Modified Ashworth Scale), gait performance (Timed Up & Go, comfortable gait speed, fast gait speed, and six-minute walk tests), and perceived participation (Stroke Impact Scale).



RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the 2 groups after the WBV training. Significant but small improvements (P<.05) in body function and gait performance were found within both groups, but the magnitude of the changes was in the range of normative variation.



CONCLUSIONS: Six weeks of WBV training on a vibration platform with conventional amplitude was not more efficient than a placebo vibrating platform. Therefore, the use of WBV training in individuals with chronic stroke and mild to moderate disability is not supported. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
volume
93
issue
2
pages
253 - 258
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000300338900011
  • pmid:22289234
  • scopus:84856389944
ISSN
0003-9993
DOI
10.1016/j.apmr.2011.09.005
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
192189c8-0dca-4388-8bbc-f94a769c5273 (old id 2367531)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22289234?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-03-02 07:40:52
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:13:42
@article{192189c8-0dca-4388-8bbc-f94a769c5273,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) training in individuals after stroke.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
DESIGN: A double-blind randomized controlled study with assessments pre- and posttraining.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
SETTING: A university hospital rehabilitation department.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
PARTICIPANTS: Participants (N=31; mean age ± SD, 62±7y; 6-101mo poststroke) were randomized to an intervention group or a control group.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
INTERVENTIONS: Supervised WBV training (2 sessions/wk for 6wk; 12 repetitions of 40-60s WBV per session). The intervention group trained on a vibrating platform with a conventional amplitude (3.75mm) and the control group on a "placebo" vibrating platform (0.2mm amplitude); the frequency was 25Hz on both platforms. All participants and examiners were blinded to the amplitudes of the 2 platforms.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome measures were isokinetic and isometric knee muscle strength (dynamometer). Secondary outcome measures were balance (Berg Balance Scale), muscle tone (Modified Ashworth Scale), gait performance (Timed Up &amp; Go, comfortable gait speed, fast gait speed, and six-minute walk tests), and perceived participation (Stroke Impact Scale).<br/><br>
<br/><br>
RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the 2 groups after the WBV training. Significant but small improvements (P&lt;.05) in body function and gait performance were found within both groups, but the magnitude of the changes was in the range of normative variation.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
CONCLUSIONS: Six weeks of WBV training on a vibration platform with conventional amplitude was not more efficient than a placebo vibrating platform. Therefore, the use of WBV training in individuals with chronic stroke and mild to moderate disability is not supported.},
  author       = {Brogårdh, Christina and Flansbjer, Ulla-Britt and Lexell, Jan},
  issn         = {0003-9993},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {253--258},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation},
  title        = {No specific effect of whole-body vibration training in chronic stroke: a double-blind randomized controlled study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2011.09.005},
  volume       = {93},
  year         = {2012},
}