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Proton-Induced X-Ray Emission Analysis - A New Tool in Quantitative Dermatology

Malmqvist, Klas LU ; Carlsson, Lars-Eric; Akselsson, Roland LU and Forslind, Bo (1983) In Scanning Electron Microscopy IV. p.1815-1825
Abstract
Proton-Induced X-ray emission analysis (PIXE) constitutes a method for trace element analysis characterized by multielemental capability, detection limits in the low ppm-range and size resolution down towards a micrometre. In applications where the sensitivity of the Electron-Induced X-ray Emission (EIXE) analysis is not sufficient and where a spatial resolution not better than a few micrometres is required, the PIXE technique provides a powerful tool. In this paper properties of the PIXE method are demonstrated by quantitative results from three different samples of dermatological interest. Firstly, mercury results from a longitudinal scan of a single hair strand from a mercury poisoned person are shown. With a spatial resolution of one... (More)
Proton-Induced X-ray emission analysis (PIXE) constitutes a method for trace element analysis characterized by multielemental capability, detection limits in the low ppm-range and size resolution down towards a micrometre. In applications where the sensitivity of the Electron-Induced X-ray Emission (EIXE) analysis is not sufficient and where a spatial resolution not better than a few micrometres is required, the PIXE technique provides a powerful tool. In this paper properties of the PIXE method are demonstrated by quantitative results from three different samples of dermatological interest. Firstly, mercury results from a longitudinal scan of a single hair strand from a mercury poisoned person are shown. With a spatial resolution of one or a few millimetres very fast scans may be performed on hair strands giving information on time and magnitude of intoxication or other exposures, as well as deficiencies. Secondly, results are given from a radial scan with a beam width of 4 micron on hair from a person exposed to high amounts of iron. The calcium, iron and zinc distributions but not the sulphur and potassium distributions show narrow peaks of concentration (less than 4 micron) about 15micron from the surface of the hair. Further investigations have to be performed in order to interpret these data. Thirdly, the depth profiles in skin of some elements were measured with a beam width of 10 micron. The results show significant increases in sulphur, calcium and zinc concentrations and significant decreases in phosphorous and potassium concentrations at the skin surface i.e. in the stratum corneum. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
proton microprobe, proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), external beam, energy-dispersive, electron microprobe, dermatology, hair, skin, cryosectioning
in
Scanning Electron Microscopy
volume
IV
pages
1815 - 1825
publisher
SEM Inc., AMF O'Hare (Chicago), IL, USA
external identifiers
  • scopus:0020972876
ISSN
0586-5581
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
eb173cec-620f-4120-bb14-a5209b94ff29 (old id 2372001)
date added to LUP
2012-03-18 10:27:57
date last changed
2017-08-20 04:33:35
@article{eb173cec-620f-4120-bb14-a5209b94ff29,
  abstract     = {Proton-Induced X-ray emission analysis (PIXE) constitutes a method for trace element analysis characterized by multielemental capability, detection limits in the low ppm-range and size resolution down towards a micrometre. In applications where the sensitivity of the Electron-Induced X-ray Emission (EIXE) analysis is not sufficient and where a spatial resolution not better than a few micrometres is required, the PIXE technique provides a powerful tool. In this paper properties of the PIXE method are demonstrated by quantitative results from three different samples of dermatological interest. Firstly, mercury results from a longitudinal scan of a single hair strand from a mercury poisoned person are shown. With a spatial resolution of one or a few millimetres very fast scans may be performed on hair strands giving information on time and magnitude of intoxication or other exposures, as well as deficiencies. Secondly, results are given from a radial scan with a beam width of 4 micron on hair from a person exposed to high amounts of iron. The calcium, iron and zinc distributions but not the sulphur and potassium distributions show narrow peaks of concentration (less than 4 micron) about 15micron from the surface of the hair. Further investigations have to be performed in order to interpret these data. Thirdly, the depth profiles in skin of some elements were measured with a beam width of 10 micron. The results show significant increases in sulphur, calcium and zinc concentrations and significant decreases in phosphorous and potassium concentrations at the skin surface i.e. in the stratum corneum.},
  author       = {Malmqvist, Klas and Carlsson, Lars-Eric and Akselsson, Roland and Forslind, Bo},
  issn         = {0586-5581},
  keyword      = {proton microprobe,proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE),external beam,energy-dispersive,electron microprobe,dermatology,hair,skin,cryosectioning},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1815--1825},
  publisher    = {SEM Inc., AMF O'Hare (Chicago), IL, USA},
  series       = {Scanning Electron Microscopy},
  title        = {Proton-Induced X-Ray Emission Analysis - A New Tool in Quantitative Dermatology},
  volume       = {IV},
  year         = {1983},
}