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Textile Dyes Disperse Orange 1 and Yellow 3 Contain More Than One Allergen As Shown by Patch Testing with Thin-Layer Chromatograms

Malinauskiene, Laura LU ; Zimerson, Erik LU ; Bruze, Magnus LU ; Ryberg, Kristina LU and Isaksson, Marléne LU (2011) In Dermatitis 22(6). p.335-343
Abstract
Background:

It is known that some patch-test preparations containing disperse dyes contain impurities with unknown relevance for the development or elicitation of contact allergy.



Objective:

To evaluate the significance of the impurities found in the commercial dyes Disperse Orange 1 (DO1) and Disperse Yellow 3 (DY3) regarding contact allergy in patients with known sensitivity to them.



Methods:

Ten patients allergic to DY3 and/or DO1 were tested with a dilution series of commercial and purified DY3 and DO1 (with water-soluble parts prepared from the commercial dyes) and with naphthalene sulfonate. Nine patients were additionally tested with thin-layer chromatograms... (More)
Background:

It is known that some patch-test preparations containing disperse dyes contain impurities with unknown relevance for the development or elicitation of contact allergy.



Objective:

To evaluate the significance of the impurities found in the commercial dyes Disperse Orange 1 (DO1) and Disperse Yellow 3 (DY3) regarding contact allergy in patients with known sensitivity to them.



Methods:

Ten patients allergic to DY3 and/or DO1 were tested with a dilution series of commercial and purified DY3 and DO1 (with water-soluble parts prepared from the commercial dyes) and with naphthalene sulfonate. Nine patients were additionally tested with thin-layer chromatograms (TLCs) made from the commercial DO1 and DY3 and with paper chromatograms made from the water-soluble part of these dyes.



Results:

Eight of nine and three of six patients tested positively to the TLCs of DO1 and DY3, respectively. Among them, 4 of 8 and 2 of 3 patients, respectively, were positive also to another spot on the TLCs. One patient was positive to the paper chromatogram from the water-soluble part of DO1. None of the tested patients reacted to naphthalene sulfonate.



Conclusion:

The results of our study suggest that there are more relevant allergens in the fat-soluble and water-soluble fractions of the commercial disperse dyes. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Dermatitis
volume
22
issue
6
pages
335 - 343
publisher
BC Decker
external identifiers
  • wos:000299973300005
  • scopus:82455191748
ISSN
1532-8163
DOI
10.2310/6620.2011.11043
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3348d925-cf0a-49bf-898b-e4d5dfb8c82b (old id 2378586)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22653007?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-04-02 09:18:34
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:12:47
@article{3348d925-cf0a-49bf-898b-e4d5dfb8c82b,
  abstract     = {Background: <br/><br>
It is known that some patch-test preparations containing disperse dyes contain impurities with unknown relevance for the development or elicitation of contact allergy. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Objective: <br/><br>
To evaluate the significance of the impurities found in the commercial dyes Disperse Orange 1 (DO1) and Disperse Yellow 3 (DY3) regarding contact allergy in patients with known sensitivity to them. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Methods: <br/><br>
Ten patients allergic to DY3 and/or DO1 were tested with a dilution series of commercial and purified DY3 and DO1 (with water-soluble parts prepared from the commercial dyes) and with naphthalene sulfonate. Nine patients were additionally tested with thin-layer chromatograms (TLCs) made from the commercial DO1 and DY3 and with paper chromatograms made from the water-soluble part of these dyes. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results: <br/><br>
Eight of nine and three of six patients tested positively to the TLCs of DO1 and DY3, respectively. Among them, 4 of 8 and 2 of 3 patients, respectively, were positive also to another spot on the TLCs. One patient was positive to the paper chromatogram from the water-soluble part of DO1. None of the tested patients reacted to naphthalene sulfonate. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusion: <br/><br>
The results of our study suggest that there are more relevant allergens in the fat-soluble and water-soluble fractions of the commercial disperse dyes.},
  author       = {Malinauskiene, Laura and Zimerson, Erik and Bruze, Magnus and Ryberg, Kristina and Isaksson, Marléne},
  issn         = {1532-8163},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {335--343},
  publisher    = {BC Decker},
  series       = {Dermatitis},
  title        = {Textile Dyes Disperse Orange 1 and Yellow 3 Contain More Than One Allergen As Shown by Patch Testing with Thin-Layer Chromatograms},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2310/6620.2011.11043},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2011},
}