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Lateral mobility of tethered vesicle - DNA assemblies

Benkoski, JJ and Höök, Fredrik LU (2005) In The Journal of Physical Chemistry Part B 109(19). p.9773-9779
Abstract
Supported lipid membranes are particularly attractive for use in biochemical assays because of their resistance to nonspecific adsorption and their unique ability to host transmembrane proteins. Although ideal for use in many surface-based detection techniques, supported bilayers can make the incorporation of proteins problematic due to the steric constraints of the underlying substrate. A recently developed strategy overcomes this obstacle by tethering liposomes to supported lipid bilayers via cholesterol-tagged DNA. Due to the fluidity of the bilayer, the vesicle assemblies exhibited significant lateral mobility. The corresponding diffusion coefficients were then investigated using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). The... (More)
Supported lipid membranes are particularly attractive for use in biochemical assays because of their resistance to nonspecific adsorption and their unique ability to host transmembrane proteins. Although ideal for use in many surface-based detection techniques, supported bilayers can make the incorporation of proteins problematic due to the steric constraints of the underlying substrate. A recently developed strategy overcomes this obstacle by tethering liposomes to supported lipid bilayers via cholesterol-tagged DNA. Due to the fluidity of the bilayer, the vesicle assemblies exhibited significant lateral mobility. The corresponding diffusion coefficients were then investigated using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). The diffusivity was neither sensitive to the size of the vesicles nor to the length of the DNA tether. However, changing from single cholesterol tethers to double cholesterol tethers caused a decrease in the diffusivity of the assemblies by a factor of 3. Perhaps even more notable was the fact that single cholesterol-DNA without vesicles diffused 6 times faster than the corresponding assemblies. Double cholesterol-DNA diffused 11 times faster. This discrepancy is believed to arise from the fact that each vesicle is tethered to the bilayer by multiple DNA pairs. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
The Journal of Physical Chemistry Part B
volume
109
issue
19
pages
9773 - 9779
publisher
The American Chemical Society
external identifiers
  • wos:000229134000082
  • scopus:19944369785
ISSN
1520-5207
DOI
10.1021/jp044947p
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7cbb29b2-cd62-47a4-afe3-84f987f37882 (old id 240072)
date added to LUP
2007-08-16 11:47:22
date last changed
2017-04-02 04:08:39
@article{7cbb29b2-cd62-47a4-afe3-84f987f37882,
  abstract     = {Supported lipid membranes are particularly attractive for use in biochemical assays because of their resistance to nonspecific adsorption and their unique ability to host transmembrane proteins. Although ideal for use in many surface-based detection techniques, supported bilayers can make the incorporation of proteins problematic due to the steric constraints of the underlying substrate. A recently developed strategy overcomes this obstacle by tethering liposomes to supported lipid bilayers via cholesterol-tagged DNA. Due to the fluidity of the bilayer, the vesicle assemblies exhibited significant lateral mobility. The corresponding diffusion coefficients were then investigated using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). The diffusivity was neither sensitive to the size of the vesicles nor to the length of the DNA tether. However, changing from single cholesterol tethers to double cholesterol tethers caused a decrease in the diffusivity of the assemblies by a factor of 3. Perhaps even more notable was the fact that single cholesterol-DNA without vesicles diffused 6 times faster than the corresponding assemblies. Double cholesterol-DNA diffused 11 times faster. This discrepancy is believed to arise from the fact that each vesicle is tethered to the bilayer by multiple DNA pairs.},
  author       = {Benkoski, JJ and Höök, Fredrik},
  issn         = {1520-5207},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {19},
  pages        = {9773--9779},
  publisher    = {The American Chemical Society},
  series       = {The Journal of Physical Chemistry Part B},
  title        = {Lateral mobility of tethered vesicle - DNA assemblies},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp044947p},
  volume       = {109},
  year         = {2005},
}