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Helicobacter pylori antibodies and gastric cancer: a gender-related difference

Janulaityte-Gunther, D; Kupcinskas, L; Pavilonis, A; Valuckas, K; Andersen, LP and Wadström, Torkel LU (2005) In Pathogens and Disease 44(2). p.191-195
Abstract
Helicobacter pylori has been proposed as a causative agent of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to define serum antibodies response against different H. pylori antigens in patients with gastric cancer. Serum samples were collected from 115 Lithuanian patients with non-cardia gastric cancer and 110 age- and sex-matched controls without cancer. Heat-stable, low-molecular-mass, and outer membrane proteins were used as antigens to analyze serum IgG antibody response against H. pylori by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Seroprevalence of H. pylori using low-molecular-mass antigen was significantly higher in gastric cancer patients, compared to controls (77% versus 57%, p < 0.05). Significant differences in the prevalence of H.... (More)
Helicobacter pylori has been proposed as a causative agent of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to define serum antibodies response against different H. pylori antigens in patients with gastric cancer. Serum samples were collected from 115 Lithuanian patients with non-cardia gastric cancer and 110 age- and sex-matched controls without cancer. Heat-stable, low-molecular-mass, and outer membrane proteins were used as antigens to analyze serum IgG antibody response against H. pylori by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Seroprevalence of H. pylori using low-molecular-mass antigen was significantly higher in gastric cancer patients, compared to controls (77% versus 57%, p < 0.05). Significant differences in the prevalence of H. pylori infection between gastric cancer patients and controls were found in females using all three studied antigens: heat-stable (98% versus 84%, p < 0.05), low-molecular-mass (88% versus 48%, p < 0.05) and outer membrane proteins (78% versus 57%, p < 0.05). In males, no significant differences were revealed between gastric cancer patients and controls. There may be other cofactors in addition to H. pylori that are important for the development of gastric cancer. H. pylori seems, however, to be a more important for development of gastric cancer in females than in males or males may have more confounding risk factors for gastric cancer than females. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Helicobacter pylori, gastric cancer, ELISA, antigens
in
Pathogens and Disease
volume
44
issue
2
pages
191 - 195
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • pmid:15866215
  • wos:000229259700013
  • scopus:24344438275
ISSN
2049-632X
DOI
10.1016/j.femsim.2004.11.011
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a08c831e-0dfc-44fd-bc69-28714a09eff4 (old id 240168)
date added to LUP
2007-08-14 14:22:10
date last changed
2017-08-06 03:48:36
@article{a08c831e-0dfc-44fd-bc69-28714a09eff4,
  abstract     = {Helicobacter pylori has been proposed as a causative agent of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to define serum antibodies response against different H. pylori antigens in patients with gastric cancer. Serum samples were collected from 115 Lithuanian patients with non-cardia gastric cancer and 110 age- and sex-matched controls without cancer. Heat-stable, low-molecular-mass, and outer membrane proteins were used as antigens to analyze serum IgG antibody response against H. pylori by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Seroprevalence of H. pylori using low-molecular-mass antigen was significantly higher in gastric cancer patients, compared to controls (77% versus 57%, p &lt; 0.05). Significant differences in the prevalence of H. pylori infection between gastric cancer patients and controls were found in females using all three studied antigens: heat-stable (98% versus 84%, p &lt; 0.05), low-molecular-mass (88% versus 48%, p &lt; 0.05) and outer membrane proteins (78% versus 57%, p &lt; 0.05). In males, no significant differences were revealed between gastric cancer patients and controls. There may be other cofactors in addition to H. pylori that are important for the development of gastric cancer. H. pylori seems, however, to be a more important for development of gastric cancer in females than in males or males may have more confounding risk factors for gastric cancer than females.},
  author       = {Janulaityte-Gunther, D and Kupcinskas, L and Pavilonis, A and Valuckas, K and Andersen, LP and Wadström, Torkel},
  issn         = {2049-632X},
  keyword      = {Helicobacter pylori,gastric cancer,ELISA,antigens},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {191--195},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Pathogens and Disease},
  title        = {Helicobacter pylori antibodies and gastric cancer: a gender-related difference},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.femsim.2004.11.011},
  volume       = {44},
  year         = {2005},
}