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Adding a cooling vest during cycling improves performance in warm and humid conditions

Luomala, Matti J.; Oksa, Juha; Salmi, Jukka A.; Linnamo, Vesa; Holmér, Ingvar LU ; Smolander, Juhani and Dugue, Benoit (2012) In Journal of Thermal Biology 37(1). p.47-55
Abstract
It is known that warm and humid environment reduces human physical performance. The present study examined whether the use of an ice-vest in such conditions can improve cycling performance. Seven participants cycled with consecutive, non-stop, 10-minute cycles of nine minutes at 60% of their (V) over dot O-2 max punctuated by a one-minute sprint at 80% (V) over dot O-2 max. The cycling protocol was continuously repeated until exhaustion. The protocol was performed with the ice-vest (ICE), worn after 30 min of cycling, and without the ice-vest throughout the protocol (CON). Ventilatory and thermal responses were continuously recorded. Electromyographic (EMG) signals from four muscles of the dominant leg were recorded over one minute, and... (More)
It is known that warm and humid environment reduces human physical performance. The present study examined whether the use of an ice-vest in such conditions can improve cycling performance. Seven participants cycled with consecutive, non-stop, 10-minute cycles of nine minutes at 60% of their (V) over dot O-2 max punctuated by a one-minute sprint at 80% (V) over dot O-2 max. The cycling protocol was continuously repeated until exhaustion. The protocol was performed with the ice-vest (ICE), worn after 30 min of cycling, and without the ice-vest throughout the protocol (CON). Ventilatory and thermal responses were continuously recorded. Electromyographic (EMG) signals from four muscles of the dominant leg were recorded over one minute, and subjective sensations were evaluated at 10-minute intervals. At exhaustion, the exercise time was recorded. Exercise time improved significantly while wearing the ice-vest from 61 min and 29 s to 74 min and 14 s (+21.5% +/- 7.6: p <0.05). Mean power frequency and amplitude of the EMG revealed decreased neuromuscular fatigue during ICE compared to CON. Ventilatory responses indicated a tendency towards lower ventilation, respiratory quotient was significantly lower and both thermal parameters and subjective sensations indicated lower thermal strain during ICE in comparison to CON. These results suggest that wearing an ice-vest during cycling in warm and humid conditions decreases thermal and physical strain, thereby improving cycling performance. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Core temperature, Ice-vest, Cycling, Performance, Thermoregulation
in
Journal of Thermal Biology
volume
37
issue
1
pages
47 - 55
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000300264600007
  • scopus:84155172011
ISSN
0306-4565
DOI
10.1016/j.jtherbio.2011.10.009
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
09dc78b2-8a06-4eee-99e3-1c085f8e8be5 (old id 2409654)
date added to LUP
2012-03-27 12:04:10
date last changed
2017-11-05 04:07:22
@article{09dc78b2-8a06-4eee-99e3-1c085f8e8be5,
  abstract     = {It is known that warm and humid environment reduces human physical performance. The present study examined whether the use of an ice-vest in such conditions can improve cycling performance. Seven participants cycled with consecutive, non-stop, 10-minute cycles of nine minutes at 60% of their (V) over dot O-2 max punctuated by a one-minute sprint at 80% (V) over dot O-2 max. The cycling protocol was continuously repeated until exhaustion. The protocol was performed with the ice-vest (ICE), worn after 30 min of cycling, and without the ice-vest throughout the protocol (CON). Ventilatory and thermal responses were continuously recorded. Electromyographic (EMG) signals from four muscles of the dominant leg were recorded over one minute, and subjective sensations were evaluated at 10-minute intervals. At exhaustion, the exercise time was recorded. Exercise time improved significantly while wearing the ice-vest from 61 min and 29 s to 74 min and 14 s (+21.5% +/- 7.6: p &lt;0.05). Mean power frequency and amplitude of the EMG revealed decreased neuromuscular fatigue during ICE compared to CON. Ventilatory responses indicated a tendency towards lower ventilation, respiratory quotient was significantly lower and both thermal parameters and subjective sensations indicated lower thermal strain during ICE in comparison to CON. These results suggest that wearing an ice-vest during cycling in warm and humid conditions decreases thermal and physical strain, thereby improving cycling performance. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Luomala, Matti J. and Oksa, Juha and Salmi, Jukka A. and Linnamo, Vesa and Holmér, Ingvar and Smolander, Juhani and Dugue, Benoit},
  issn         = {0306-4565},
  keyword      = {Core temperature,Ice-vest,Cycling,Performance,Thermoregulation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {47--55},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Thermal Biology},
  title        = {Adding a cooling vest during cycling improves performance in warm and humid conditions},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtherbio.2011.10.009},
  volume       = {37},
  year         = {2012},
}