Advanced

Moving from ’gut feeling’ to ’pure facts’: launching the ASI interview as part of in-service training for social workers.

Martinell Barfoed, Elizabeth LU and Jacobsson, Katarina LU (2012) In Nordic Social Work Research 2(1). p.5-20
Abstract
Several standardized assessment instruments have been introduced in social work in the last ten years. One of them, the Addiction Severity Index (ASI), is used today in the Swedish social services, and in the Prison and probation services. Swedish state authorities make strong declarations to implement the ASI-interview while critics are sceptic to both its practical relevance and epistemological grounds. Given this background, the launching of the ASI-interview is important to study as a case of how new instruments (flagged under the banner of EBP) are introduced. How is this rather new innovation introduced to the field of social work? The aim of the article is to analyse how the ASI-interview is presented and taught through in-service... (More)
Several standardized assessment instruments have been introduced in social work in the last ten years. One of them, the Addiction Severity Index (ASI), is used today in the Swedish social services, and in the Prison and probation services. Swedish state authorities make strong declarations to implement the ASI-interview while critics are sceptic to both its practical relevance and epistemological grounds. Given this background, the launching of the ASI-interview is important to study as a case of how new instruments (flagged under the banner of EBP) are introduced. How is this rather new innovation introduced to the field of social work? The aim of the article is to analyse how the ASI-interview is presented and taught through in-service training for Swedish social workers. From observations of in-service training sessions, two professional styles seem to surface: a “traditional” and a “new” professional style. The course leader tends to use contrasting dichotomies as resources for constructing these professional styles. For example, “objectivity” and “scientificity” are presented as new professional ideals, rather than common sense or ”gut feeling”, the latter connected to traditional social work. The construction of a new professional style can be seen as an endeavour to achieve professional status in a more classical sense, partly by making the profession and its content more visible, and also by asserting its legitimacy as evidence-based work. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Standardized assessment instruments, ASI-interview, in-service training, evidence-based practice, social work, gut-feeling
in
Nordic Social Work Research
volume
2
issue
1
pages
5 - 20
publisher
Taylor & Francis
ISSN
2156-857X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f1b260dc-5652-4281-9752-3e19c32f1c0f (old id 2426476)
date added to LUP
2012-03-27 09:59:13
date last changed
2016-04-15 16:38:56
@article{f1b260dc-5652-4281-9752-3e19c32f1c0f,
  abstract     = {Several standardized assessment instruments have been introduced in social work in the last ten years. One of them, the Addiction Severity Index (ASI), is used today in the Swedish social services, and in the Prison and probation services. Swedish state authorities make strong declarations to implement the ASI-interview while critics are sceptic to both its practical relevance and epistemological grounds. Given this background, the launching of the ASI-interview is important to study as a case of how new instruments (flagged under the banner of EBP) are introduced. How is this rather new innovation introduced to the field of social work? The aim of the article is to analyse how the ASI-interview is presented and taught through in-service training for Swedish social workers. From observations of in-service training sessions, two professional styles seem to surface: a “traditional” and a “new” professional style. The course leader tends to use contrasting dichotomies as resources for constructing these professional styles. For example, “objectivity” and “scientificity” are presented as new professional ideals, rather than common sense or ”gut feeling”, the latter connected to traditional social work. The construction of a new professional style can be seen as an endeavour to achieve professional status in a more classical sense, partly by making the profession and its content more visible, and also by asserting its legitimacy as evidence-based work.},
  author       = {Martinell Barfoed, Elizabeth and Jacobsson, Katarina},
  issn         = {2156-857X},
  keyword      = {Standardized assessment instruments,ASI-interview,in-service training,evidence-based practice,social work,gut-feeling},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {5--20},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Nordic Social Work Research},
  title        = {Moving from ’gut feeling’ to ’pure facts’: launching the ASI interview as part of in-service training for social workers.},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2012},
}