Advanced

Localised boundary air layer and clothing evaporative resistances for individual body segments.

Wang, Faming LU ; Del Ferraro, Simona; Lin, Li-Yen; Mayor, Tiago Sotto; Molinaro, Vincenzo; Ribeiro, Miguel; Gao, Chuansi LU ; Kuklane, Kalev LU and Holmér, Ingvar LU (2012) In Ergonomics 55(7). p.799-812
Abstract
Evaporative resistance is an important parameter to characterise clothing thermal comfort. However, previous work has focused mainly on either total static or dynamic evaporative resistance. There is a lack of investigation of localised clothing evaporative resistance. The objective of this study was to study localised evaporative resistance using sweating thermal manikins. The individual and interaction effects of air and body movements on localised resultant evaporative resistance were examined in a strict protocol. The boundary air layer's localised evaporative resistance was investigated on nude sweating manikins at three different air velocity levels (0.18, 0.48 and 0.78 m/s) and three different walking speeds (0, 0.96 and 1.17 m/s).... (More)
Evaporative resistance is an important parameter to characterise clothing thermal comfort. However, previous work has focused mainly on either total static or dynamic evaporative resistance. There is a lack of investigation of localised clothing evaporative resistance. The objective of this study was to study localised evaporative resistance using sweating thermal manikins. The individual and interaction effects of air and body movements on localised resultant evaporative resistance were examined in a strict protocol. The boundary air layer's localised evaporative resistance was investigated on nude sweating manikins at three different air velocity levels (0.18, 0.48 and 0.78 m/s) and three different walking speeds (0, 0.96 and 1.17 m/s). Similarly, localised clothing evaporative resistance was measured on sweating manikins at three different air velocities (0.13, 0.48 and 0.70 m/s) and three walking speeds (0, 0.96 and 1.17 m/s). Results showed that the wind speed has distinct effects on local body segments. In contrast, walking speed brought much more effect on the limbs, such as thigh and forearm, than on body torso, such as back and waist. In addition, the combined effect of body and air movement on localised evaporative resistance demonstrated that the walking effect has more influence on the extremities than on the torso. Therefore, localised evaporative resistance values should be provided when reporting test results in order to clearly describe clothing local moisture transfer characteristics. Practitioner Summary: Localised boundary air layer and clothing evaporative resistances are essential data for clothing design and assessment of thermal comfort. A comprehensive understanding of the effects of air and body movement on localised evaporative resistance is also necessary by both textile and apparel researchers and industry. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
localised evaporative resistance, sweating thermal manikin, clothing ensemble, boundary air layer, reduction factor
in
Ergonomics
volume
55
issue
7
pages
799 - 812
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000305557300009
  • pmid:22455389
  • scopus:84866852957
ISSN
0014-0139
DOI
10.1080/00140139.2012.668948
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ed5d4c45-edca-40e4-a84c-65399650b071 (old id 2431392)
date added to LUP
2012-07-06 09:19:17
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:21:24
@article{ed5d4c45-edca-40e4-a84c-65399650b071,
  abstract     = {Evaporative resistance is an important parameter to characterise clothing thermal comfort. However, previous work has focused mainly on either total static or dynamic evaporative resistance. There is a lack of investigation of localised clothing evaporative resistance. The objective of this study was to study localised evaporative resistance using sweating thermal manikins. The individual and interaction effects of air and body movements on localised resultant evaporative resistance were examined in a strict protocol. The boundary air layer's localised evaporative resistance was investigated on nude sweating manikins at three different air velocity levels (0.18, 0.48 and 0.78 m/s) and three different walking speeds (0, 0.96 and 1.17 m/s). Similarly, localised clothing evaporative resistance was measured on sweating manikins at three different air velocities (0.13, 0.48 and 0.70 m/s) and three walking speeds (0, 0.96 and 1.17 m/s). Results showed that the wind speed has distinct effects on local body segments. In contrast, walking speed brought much more effect on the limbs, such as thigh and forearm, than on body torso, such as back and waist. In addition, the combined effect of body and air movement on localised evaporative resistance demonstrated that the walking effect has more influence on the extremities than on the torso. Therefore, localised evaporative resistance values should be provided when reporting test results in order to clearly describe clothing local moisture transfer characteristics. Practitioner Summary: Localised boundary air layer and clothing evaporative resistances are essential data for clothing design and assessment of thermal comfort. A comprehensive understanding of the effects of air and body movement on localised evaporative resistance is also necessary by both textile and apparel researchers and industry.},
  author       = {Wang, Faming and Del Ferraro, Simona and Lin, Li-Yen and Mayor, Tiago Sotto and Molinaro, Vincenzo and Ribeiro, Miguel and Gao, Chuansi and Kuklane, Kalev and Holmér, Ingvar},
  issn         = {0014-0139},
  keyword      = {localised evaporative resistance,sweating thermal manikin,clothing ensemble,boundary air layer,reduction factor},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {799--812},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Ergonomics},
  title        = {Localised boundary air layer and clothing evaporative resistances for individual body segments.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00140139.2012.668948},
  volume       = {55},
  year         = {2012},
}