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Patch testing with own cosmetics-a prospective study of testing and reporting of adverse effects to the Swedish Medical Products Agency.

Tammela, Monica; Lindberg, Magnus; Isaksson, Marléne LU ; Inerot, Annica; Rudel, Jana and Berne, Berit (2012) In Contact Dermatitis 67(1). p.42-46
Abstract
Background: The Swedish Medical Products Agency (MPA) provides a voluntary reporting system for adverse reactions to cosmetics. However, the reporting is sparse, and the products involved are sometimes difficult to identify.



Objectives: To investigate how often patients referred for patch testing were tested with the cosmetic products that they had been using themselves, and to improve the reporting to the MPA by the use of photographic documentation of product labels.



Patients and methods: Consecutive patients at five dermatology departments who were patch tested with their own cosmetics were included. Reports including protocols of positive patch test results for the patients' own cosmetics and... (More)
Background: The Swedish Medical Products Agency (MPA) provides a voluntary reporting system for adverse reactions to cosmetics. However, the reporting is sparse, and the products involved are sometimes difficult to identify.



Objectives: To investigate how often patients referred for patch testing were tested with the cosmetic products that they had been using themselves, and to improve the reporting to the MPA by the use of photographic documentation of product labels.



Patients and methods: Consecutive patients at five dermatology departments who were patch tested with their own cosmetics were included. Reports including protocols of positive patch test results for the patients' own cosmetics and photographs/photocopies of product labels were sent to the MPA.



Results: Three hundred and sixteen of 948 patients (33%) were tested with their own cosmetics, and 15% of these tested positive with one or more products. The number of reports was more than three times higher than in corresponding periods in earlier years. For 79% of the products, photographs/photocopies of the containers were submitted, and for 30%, batch numbers were submitted.



Conclusions: For a substantial number of patients, their own cosmetics were suspected of causing adverse reactions and were therefore tested. During the study, the number of reports to the MPA tripled, and the relevant products were easier to identify. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
cosmetovigilance, adverse cosmetic reactions, patch testing, reporting, system
in
Contact Dermatitis
volume
67
issue
1
pages
42 - 46
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000304993100007
  • pmid:22443095
  • scopus:84862167273
ISSN
0105-1873
DOI
10.1111/j.1600-0536.2012.02058.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4eb33dd2-f309-4489-8203-e780db0329e5 (old id 2431520)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22443095?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-04-03 12:43:03
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:48:12
@article{4eb33dd2-f309-4489-8203-e780db0329e5,
  abstract     = {Background: The Swedish Medical Products Agency (MPA) provides a voluntary reporting system for adverse reactions to cosmetics. However, the reporting is sparse, and the products involved are sometimes difficult to identify. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Objectives: To investigate how often patients referred for patch testing were tested with the cosmetic products that they had been using themselves, and to improve the reporting to the MPA by the use of photographic documentation of product labels. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Patients and methods: Consecutive patients at five dermatology departments who were patch tested with their own cosmetics were included. Reports including protocols of positive patch test results for the patients' own cosmetics and photographs/photocopies of product labels were sent to the MPA. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results: Three hundred and sixteen of 948 patients (33%) were tested with their own cosmetics, and 15% of these tested positive with one or more products. The number of reports was more than three times higher than in corresponding periods in earlier years. For 79% of the products, photographs/photocopies of the containers were submitted, and for 30%, batch numbers were submitted. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusions: For a substantial number of patients, their own cosmetics were suspected of causing adverse reactions and were therefore tested. During the study, the number of reports to the MPA tripled, and the relevant products were easier to identify.},
  author       = {Tammela, Monica and Lindberg, Magnus and Isaksson, Marléne and Inerot, Annica and Rudel, Jana and Berne, Berit},
  issn         = {0105-1873},
  keyword      = {cosmetovigilance,adverse cosmetic reactions,patch testing,reporting,system},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {42--46},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Contact Dermatitis},
  title        = {Patch testing with own cosmetics-a prospective study of testing and reporting of adverse effects to the Swedish Medical Products Agency.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0536.2012.02058.x},
  volume       = {67},
  year         = {2012},
}