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Effects of territory competition and climate change on timing of arrival to breeding grounds: a game-theory approach.

Johansson, Jacob LU and Jonzén, Niclas LU (2012) In American Naturalist 179(4). p.463-474
Abstract
Abstract Phenology is an important part of life history that is gaining increased attention because of recent climate change. We use game theory to model phenological adaptation in migratory birds that compete for territories at their breeding grounds. We investigate how the evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) for the timing of arrival is affected by changes in the onset of spring, the timing of the resource peak, and the season length. We compare the ESS mean arrival date with the environmental optimum, that is, the mean arrival date that maximizes fitness in the absence of competition. When competition is strong, the ESS mean arrival date responds less than the environmental optimum to shifts in the resource peak but more to changes in... (More)
Abstract Phenology is an important part of life history that is gaining increased attention because of recent climate change. We use game theory to model phenological adaptation in migratory birds that compete for territories at their breeding grounds. We investigate how the evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) for the timing of arrival is affected by changes in the onset of spring, the timing of the resource peak, and the season length. We compare the ESS mean arrival date with the environmental optimum, that is, the mean arrival date that maximizes fitness in the absence of competition. When competition is strong, the ESS mean arrival date responds less than the environmental optimum to shifts in the resource peak but more to changes in the onset of spring. Increased season length may not necessarily affect the environmental optimum but can still advance the ESS mean arrival date. Conversely, shifting a narrow resource distribution may change the environmental optimum without affecting the ESS mean arrival date. The ESS mean arrival date and the environmental optimum may even shift in different directions. Hence, treating phenology as an evolutionary game rather than an optimization problem fundamentally changes what we predict to be an adaptive response to environmental changes. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
migratory birds, life history, evolutionary game theory, phenology, climate change
in
American Naturalist
volume
179
issue
4
pages
463 - 474
publisher
University of Chicago Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000301975200006
  • pmid:22437176
  • scopus:84858790253
ISSN
0003-0147
DOI
10.1086/664624
project
BECC
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
660bf2aa-37e3-40c8-82ac-66243d4cbea8 (old id 2431560)
date added to LUP
2012-05-08 11:10:22
date last changed
2017-04-30 03:27:23
@article{660bf2aa-37e3-40c8-82ac-66243d4cbea8,
  abstract     = {Abstract Phenology is an important part of life history that is gaining increased attention because of recent climate change. We use game theory to model phenological adaptation in migratory birds that compete for territories at their breeding grounds. We investigate how the evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) for the timing of arrival is affected by changes in the onset of spring, the timing of the resource peak, and the season length. We compare the ESS mean arrival date with the environmental optimum, that is, the mean arrival date that maximizes fitness in the absence of competition. When competition is strong, the ESS mean arrival date responds less than the environmental optimum to shifts in the resource peak but more to changes in the onset of spring. Increased season length may not necessarily affect the environmental optimum but can still advance the ESS mean arrival date. Conversely, shifting a narrow resource distribution may change the environmental optimum without affecting the ESS mean arrival date. The ESS mean arrival date and the environmental optimum may even shift in different directions. Hence, treating phenology as an evolutionary game rather than an optimization problem fundamentally changes what we predict to be an adaptive response to environmental changes.},
  author       = {Johansson, Jacob and Jonzén, Niclas},
  issn         = {0003-0147},
  keyword      = {migratory birds,life history,evolutionary game theory,phenology,climate change},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {463--474},
  publisher    = {University of Chicago Press},
  series       = {American Naturalist},
  title        = {Effects of territory competition and climate change on timing of arrival to breeding grounds: a game-theory approach.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/664624},
  volume       = {179},
  year         = {2012},
}