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Prevalence and predictors of healthcare utilization among older people (60+): Focusing on ADL dependency and risk of depression.

Sandberg, Magnus LU ; Kristensson, Jimmie LU ; Midlöv, Patrik LU ; Fagerström, Cecilia LU and Jakobsson, Ulf LU (2012) In Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics 54(3). p.349-363
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate healthcare utilization patterns over a six-year period among older people (60+), classified as dependent/independent in Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and/or at/not at risk of depression and to identify healthcare utilization predictors. A sample (n=1402) comprising ten age cohorts aged between 60 and 96 years was drawn from the Swedish National study on Aging and Care (SNAC). Baseline data were collected between 2001 and 2003. Number and length of hospital stays were collected for six years after baseline year. Group differences and mean changes over time were investigated. Healthcare utilization predictors were explored using multiple linear regression analysis. The results revealed that 21-24%... (More)
The aim of this study was to investigate healthcare utilization patterns over a six-year period among older people (60+), classified as dependent/independent in Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and/or at/not at risk of depression and to identify healthcare utilization predictors. A sample (n=1402) comprising ten age cohorts aged between 60 and 96 years was drawn from the Swedish National study on Aging and Care (SNAC). Baseline data were collected between 2001 and 2003. Number and length of hospital stays were collected for six years after baseline year. Group differences and mean changes over time were investigated. Healthcare utilization predictors were explored using multiple linear regression analysis. The results revealed that 21-24% had at least one hospital stay in the six years after baseline, 29-37% among ADL dependent subjects and 24-33% among those at risk of depression. There was a significant increase of hospital stays in all groups over time. ADL-dependent subjects and those at risk of depression had significant more hospital stays, except for those at/not at risk of depression in years 2, 4 and 5. The healthcare utilization predictors 5-6 years after baseline were mainly age, previous healthcare utilization and various symptoms and, in 1-2 and 3-4 years after baseline, age, various diagnostic groups and various physical variables. Thus healthcare utilization patterns seem to be similar for the different groups, but it is difficult to find universal predictors. This suggests that different variables should be considered, including both ADL and psychosocial variables, when trying to identify future healthcare users. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
volume
54
issue
3
pages
349 - 363
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000302959400016
  • pmid:22421356
  • scopus:84859875851
ISSN
1872-6976
DOI
10.1016/j.archger.2012.02.006
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9478a4ea-9a80-4552-9d22-243325718c13 (old id 2431753)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22421356?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-04-03 11:06:34
date last changed
2017-09-10 04:18:25
@article{9478a4ea-9a80-4552-9d22-243325718c13,
  abstract     = {The aim of this study was to investigate healthcare utilization patterns over a six-year period among older people (60+), classified as dependent/independent in Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and/or at/not at risk of depression and to identify healthcare utilization predictors. A sample (n=1402) comprising ten age cohorts aged between 60 and 96 years was drawn from the Swedish National study on Aging and Care (SNAC). Baseline data were collected between 2001 and 2003. Number and length of hospital stays were collected for six years after baseline year. Group differences and mean changes over time were investigated. Healthcare utilization predictors were explored using multiple linear regression analysis. The results revealed that 21-24% had at least one hospital stay in the six years after baseline, 29-37% among ADL dependent subjects and 24-33% among those at risk of depression. There was a significant increase of hospital stays in all groups over time. ADL-dependent subjects and those at risk of depression had significant more hospital stays, except for those at/not at risk of depression in years 2, 4 and 5. The healthcare utilization predictors 5-6 years after baseline were mainly age, previous healthcare utilization and various symptoms and, in 1-2 and 3-4 years after baseline, age, various diagnostic groups and various physical variables. Thus healthcare utilization patterns seem to be similar for the different groups, but it is difficult to find universal predictors. This suggests that different variables should be considered, including both ADL and psychosocial variables, when trying to identify future healthcare users.},
  author       = {Sandberg, Magnus and Kristensson, Jimmie and Midlöv, Patrik and Fagerström, Cecilia and Jakobsson, Ulf},
  issn         = {1872-6976},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {349--363},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics},
  title        = {Prevalence and predictors of healthcare utilization among older people (60+): Focusing on ADL dependency and risk of depression.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.archger.2012.02.006},
  volume       = {54},
  year         = {2012},
}